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File: 1465754407935.jpg (94 KB, 1280x855)
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Zootopia General: Night talks edition

Pastebin: pastebin.com/iYDU8g2T
Booru: zoo.booru.org
ZTArchive: ztarchive.com
Desustorage: desuarchive.org/trash

Previous thread: archive.b-stats.org/trash/thread/6559278
Thematic Thursdays: Winter
More information: derpy.me/trashthematicthursdays
>>
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How do you think this ship is like?
>>
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>>6565500
>>
nth for comfy Nick
>>
I'd recommend pastebin
>>6565455
>>
>>6565509
>ワーイ
Ya---y
>>
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If anyone here likes Remmy and Charlie I drew a thing
>>
>>6565540
ty translator anon
>>
>>6565546
we like charlie and remmy

we definitely like your thing
>>
>>6565509
Both are dead serious on the open and barely show any affection. No fun allowed and even come to actual arguments every time.

When they're private both relax and Jack can be normal without trying hard to be taken seriously and Skye can also be cuddly without getting weird looks.
>>
>>6565546
holy shit I love thing
>>
>>6565546
Damn this is good
>>
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In a bit of a porn mood at the moment

Taking requests
>>
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>>6565546
>>
>>6565546
Wow this thing. Like thing lots
>>
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>>6565546
wtf i love chemmy now
>>
>>6565570
lewd the anteater and Gideon
>>
>>6565570
Remmy blowing a big load on Betty's face.

Betty is clearly enjoying it.
>>
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>>6565570
Show us what lewd things your anteater can do with his tongue
>>
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>>6565546
>the lockpicks in the door
It's the little things.
>>
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Posting this again since new thread happened not long after.

Also taking stream requests. Anon chat is open.
https://picarto.tv/093
>>
>>6565570
>to fat to be remmy
>doesn't quite resemble Wolter and anneke
literally who?

Oh and a request for remmy strung up as a pinata staring in horror as a blindfolded ozzy paces foward with a bat, as Marty snickers evily in the back round

Also, check em
>>
>>6565546
I don't even follow PackStreet and you just sold me on Remmy x Charlie
>>
>>6565602
>talks shit, whiffs dubs
cucked again, lionfart
>>
>>6565594
Gideon with a floofy winter coat?
>>
>>6565609
Fuck off smellwater
>>
>>6565605
They are my favorite even if Betty has a way, way higher chance of ending up canon (Although I doubt Weaver would make any one of them canon to begin with)
>>
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>>6565546
>>
>>6565594
>https://picarto.tv/093
maybe if you get a second the requests from here
>>6565414
>>
>>6565605
>I don't even follow PackStreet
Do you want to get crucified?
This is how you get yourself crucified.
>>
>>6565546
>female spooning male
alright
you're my favorite person now
>>
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>>6565661
Man, nah, don't be that way, anon.
>>
>>6565661
im gon crucifi u
on mi dik
lil kukboi fgt kys lamoo fukin ass homolvre
>>
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>>6565651
>>
>>6565475
Why are buns so fun to draw?
>>
>>6565647
We might not see a canon pair, but it looks Remmy wil get laid in near future. With betty hopefully.
> retarded sheep and autistic fox
Why is Remmy retarded?

Btw did you notice the debate that started from your picture in one of the previous threads?
>>
>>6565661
I dont either, fite me
>>
>>6565647
If you're new to the threads, you should check out some of Otterly's fics where he ships Anneke Remmy.
http://pastebin.com/FFJAgcua
>>
>>6565681
>>6565691
>>6565716

Heathens! Our lord and saviour Weaver will punish you.
>>
>>6565712
I didn't, I went to bed an hour or so after the post, I believe.

What was it over?
>>
>>6565732
My lord and savior is Chumpy.
>>
>>6565734
It reignited the fight from when Remmy Fucked Up re: Al, Ozzy and Velvet.

>REMMY DID NOTHING WRONG
>REMMY DID EVERYTHING WRONG
>>
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>>6565709
very fun
>>
>>6565749
Clearly it was all Marty's fault
>>
>>6565734
Look up your post and follow the debate

http://www.ztarchive.com/trash/thread/6555044/6555044.html#p6557273
>>
>>6565546
So I haven't been around in a while, what's your name?
>>
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Whoever first posted this song, I hate you. I've been able to listen to nothing else for days it's so good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjmfQ6ejkPs

Post what you're listening to right now.
>>
>>6565769
That's a comfy bun.
Anyone who rocks the bowtie is a comfy person.
>>
>>6565825
Man I love this image.
>>
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>>6565849
Fanart is a fucking treasure of amazing coloring and bodacious 80s movie references.
>>
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>>6565870
>>
>>6565647
>>6565546
I need more of your Charlie right now
>>
>>6565594
AAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH!
It's beautiful!
>>
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>>6565870
I think this one is my favorite
>>
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>>6565583
Not my best but there ya go

>>6565577
... I'm never gonna live this down, am I?
>>
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>>6565732
>>6565742
weaver a false cod
>>
>>6565934
weaver is the holiest of mackerels
>>
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Man, I come home from work and check the previous thread for the day's goings ons, and what do I find?

>>6561428
>>6564516
>>6565091
These three really awesome birthday gifts from these three really awesome artists!
Thanks a ton guys, you're all the tops! (the naked Beaver cake-topper on the last one was a riot)

>>6565546
This has nothing to do with me, but I love Pack Street, Charlie is awesome, and so is this comic.
>>
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>>6565934
police get this nude vagrant off the street
>>
>>6565920
I love it. Thanks, Grivaire!
>>
>>6562897
Thanks...?

>>6563715
I love how you color!
>>
>>6565594
Extremely disorganized right now and having a hard time keeping up with the threads, sorry. Taking a few sketch requests right now, if you guys want.
>>
>>6565934
Hey TGG! I've got a quick question for you. Have you changed your style or the program that you use? I'm just wondering because your are has looked a bit rougher lately.
>>
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>>6566040
Yea, I'm using a smaller canvas and the binary pen for these fast sketches. It's much quicker and more fun.
>>
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>>6565546
>a hidden desire has been quenched
great comic, anon, love your style!

>>6565709
because they are cute (nooffense)
>>6565769 is evident of that fact
>>
>>6566056
Alright, that's what I thought. Thanks!
>>
>>
>>6565546
a new contentfag has appeared! what's your name, kind stranger?
>>
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>tfw comfy thread

feelsgoodman
>>
Anyone have a link to that character creation game?
>>
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>>6566292
>>
>>6566327
Thanks!
>>
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>>6566265
comf
>>
>>6566367
That

is a comfy picture.
>>
>>6566367
... wait... those bubbles...

...is Judy turbofarting?
>>
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>>6566367
this thread needs more social grooming
>>
>>
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>>6566406
This artist has a ton of them. He has an entire theory about how its a sign of affection akin to kissing because of how mammals preen their fur.
>>
December already...
Time flies so fast...
>>
>>6566420
Here's a higher res version of that pic.
>>
>>6565661
Yeah because not liking oc's is bad
>>
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>>
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>>6566265
Comfy is best.

Comfy threads is best threads.

>>6565825
Speaking of comfy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gFUTQMCtv4

>>6566367
Speaking of comfy!

Bath pictures are too cute!
>>
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>>6566390
>>6566390
>>
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>>6566506
I used to do that when I was a kid.

Man, I need to take a bath again sometime.
>>
>>6566449
Replaced. Thanks, anon
>>
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>>6566390
>more like turboqueefing
>>
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Hey guys, I haven't been here for a while, can someone give me a summary of the past three weeks or so?
>>
>>6566560
Such cute style!
>>
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>>6565825
THAT WAS ME.

THAT WAS ME MOTHERFUCKER.

WELCOME TO MY WORLD.

I HAVE ONLY LISTENED TO THIS SONG FOR 6 DAYS NOW.

NO OTHER SONGS COMPARE.
>>
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>>6566406
Agreed
>>
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>>6566560
It got cold.
>>
>>6566560
Porn Detectives
>>
>>6566560
Comicanon revealed that he was Weaver the entire time.
Byron Howard posted a picture on twitter of Des and Molly fucking along with the hashtag #Zoot2.
Inky now only does requests for donations. She also only accepts payment in dick pics. Include the balls and she colors.
Bunanon is back. However, its an AU Bunanon where she's taller than Red. Other than that, everything is exactly the same.
Nobby bought a Bad Dragon dildo and waved it around on stream.
>>
>>6566611
>Nobby bought a Bad Dragon dildo and waved it around on stream.
I am inclined to believe the last one
>>
>>6565825
>>6566578
Huh, this is super good.

This is a rock ballad, right? Because I listened this and enjoyed it a lot, and it has a similar feel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMrFiOjxk5s

I know nothing about the genre though.
>>
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haha, best ship.
>>
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>>
>>6566649
Protomen take a lot on inspiration from that movie.

Streets of Fire is the most 80's thing on the planet, and none of that fake, retro arcade stylized 80's. It's billed as a "Rock and Roll Fable"

And the music is fucking awesome. Hard to find music as hype as this.
>>
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>>6566658
Wait a minute
Did you do this?
>>
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Rolling for street; have some pie
>>
>>6566643
Such a spicy lewd sloth
>>
>>6566602
Yeah I heard about that. That was insane.
>>
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>>6566658
Behind every great bun...
...is a great fox.
>>
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>>6566545
>>
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>>6566265
comfy is best
>>
>>6566750
>hearts
this does things to me and i dont know why
>>
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>>6566737
I really like how a stronger, bigger fox just lets smol rabbit to rustle her floof or hug her tail.

very cute, would recommend.
>>
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>>6566766
>hug her tail
tail hugging is GOAT
>>
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>>6566611
>>6566696
how dare you betray my trust like that
what happens in stream stays in stream
>>
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>>6566691
>Dry River Road
>Literally right in the middle of Hyenahurst
>>
>>6564755
>So is she... the madam of a cat house? I only saw her mention dancing and men, hmm. Are her employees men or women?

I already said they're men. She owns a male strip club.

For women who love to oggle men.

Like I said before though I don't think she's above investing in that sort of thing though.

>>6564873
>He's not a cowboy, or a firefighter, or a police officer, or a doctor, or any of the other things he blurts out when asked.
You forgot magician and lawyer.

>>6564913
>He's a mattress seller.
Don't compare him to that man.
>>
>>6566787
You post all your pictures from the stream to the threads.
Check.
Fucking.
Mate.
>>
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rolling for job
have ahegao bun
>>
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>>6566739
>>
>>6566787
Oh come on Slothy, its all over Xslothtube and all the other sloth porn streaming sites.
>>
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>>6566611
>Inky now only does requests for donations. She also only accepts payment in dick pics. Include the balls and she colors.

That doesn't sound like too bad a deal, but I'd feel bad for accepting payment when I can draw stuff for free.

Including dicks.
>>
>>6566808
You know what would make this picture perfect?
Heart

shaped

pupils.
>>
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>>6565546
fuck
>>
>>6566578
Pej? Is that you?
>>
>>6566797

Oh, my bad! I must have missed that. That's really interesting. A motherly figure who has a really prurient business. It could be used in a lot of ways, like to show that one can be sexually-invested (literally, in this case) but also be a loving and supportive mother.

I'll leave the more porn-like conclusions to others.
>>
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>>6566830
>>
>>6566860
DEAR GOD
>>
>>6565920
GREAT lewds
>>
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>>6566840
Nope, I'm a different dude.

>>6566860
This has such potential. Keep going
>>
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>>6566852
Like I said, I likely won't draw her much.

I mean maybe if she gets requested or if I get any ideas. Which happens on and off it seems.
>>
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>>6565726
Thanks for the shill, friend

I'm glad you thought of me
>>
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>>6566808
>>
>>6566860
>>6566894
gifts from heaven
gifts from heaven
>>
>>6566893
The Way Back was no joke one of the first fics I ever read and it got me reading. Thanks for being cool.
>>
>>6565920
Holy shit, how'd I miss this? Top stuff, love Betty's expression here. You've really improved, I remember seeing criticism that your faces didn't have enough definition and the expressions you've done lately have really taken off.
>>
>>6566894
>Nick cums so much is bursts through Judy's body and tears through her pupils and leaks out her eyes
>>
How's it going /ztg/?
>>
turns out we're casuals
>>
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>>6566954
Pretty good, managed to get a little drawing time in. How about you?
>>
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>>6566978
yikes
>>
>>6566978
>that inking
>that cursive
>SSHHHIIINNNNNNYYYY

bretty good put risky investment imho but good for you anon
>>
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>>6566981
have some stuff to do for college but other than that pretty comfy
>>
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>>6566978
>>
>>6566890

OH NO SHE'S HOT.

I really love lycaons too!

I cook up ideas constantly but I feel bad focusing on my own OCs when you have so many great ones.

Maybe somewhere down the line it will feel less awkward.
>>
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>>6565546
Noice. Good fucking thing man
>>
>>6567115
This is an incredibly flattering sentiment! I'm glad people like my OCs enough to consider doing things regarding them.

This might sound weird, but I think I really needed to hear this.
>>
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>>6566890
10/10 would pound that granny.
>>
>>6567207

Of course! I just think it's weird to engage an artist about their characters and then segue it into one's own, no matter how relevant it might seem.

I hope to see more of her in the future (I didn't catch her name!).
>>
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gimme some quick requests
>>
>>6567262
Charmy
>>
>>6567262
Gideon dating Judy.
>>
>>6567262
Nick ahegao with heart shaped pupils.
>>
>>6567262
Jack and Sky(e) on a ferris wheel.
>>
>>6567239
She doesn't have a name yet.

There are a few characters I haven't named yet in fact.
>>
>>6567297
>>
>>6567262
Calvin and Tristan cosplaying as a redwall badger lord and his bun bun servant.
>>
>>6567262
Betty the Sheep and Remmy the Wolf
>>
>>6567262
Nick giving Judy a massage
>>
>>6567262
Nick dying from a fluff overdose
>>
>>6567262
Nick looking for his spare keys inside Judy's rectum.
>>
>>6565546
encourage good CC with (You)s
>>
>>6567273
>>6567328
I like these. Does this work like POTC 3 where you only need two votes to win?
>>
>>6565709
I recall Weaver said something about how their ears are good to emote and also can resemble hair or something.

Anyone remembers this?
>>
>>6567262
Desmond ahegao with heart shaped pupils.
>>
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>>6565825
Awesome Pic. As to what im listening to, here some more 80's inspiried stuff.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjsemNhze7U
>>
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I'm not sure if this was already leaked to the thread but,

https://sli.mg/a/Hp56Zw

Every image in that gay pack.
>>
>>6567297

Might I suggest something beginning with Ly for lycaon?
>>
>>6566671
I like that retro arcade stylized 80's stuff though...
>>
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>>6567267
>>
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>>6567419
Is very nice
>>
>>6567435

10/10 would cuddle
>>
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>>6565904
Man, the top one is rustling some old memory. I have in my mind a very evocative image of a guy looking up like that, and the round window view of his ship is framed like a halo-cum-space helmet.

Does that ring any bells?
>>
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>>6567429
There's nothing wrong with it, but to me I get a much stronger 80's vibe from psuedo cool guys mashing together rock n roll culture with rebellious tendencies and self determination.
>>
>>6567435
Where were you when Charlie and Remmy had a kid?

ALL OTHER REMMY SHIPS BTFO
>>
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>>6566420
I thought that was common knowledge.
>>
>>6567305

>not asking for it
>literally asking for it in writing written across her shirt

at some point you have to accept that part of the onus is on you when your clothing is *literally* asking for it, sarcastic or not.
>>
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KSYGER HERE TO SPREAD HOLIDAY CHEER
>>
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>>6567297
>>6567421
that's MADAME Ly m8, show some respect
(btw Inky, I totally imagined teh bouncer of the establishment are Lionesses and Hyenas)
>>
>>6567503
Nice glasses NERD
>>
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>>6567419
>Guys with multiple pairs of nipples
Unf. I want to nibble them all.
>>
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>>6567457
You have a point. I guess, since i grew up watching lots of 80's action movies, the new retro wave arcadey 80's stuff just "sounds" more 80's to me, for some reason.
>>
Do any of you guys have any good asmr stuff I can listen too? I need to write and that shit helps me calm down.
>>
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>>6565546
>
>>6566750
Source?
>>6567498
If I put illegal things on my shirt, please don't do them just because you do everything you're asked
>>
>>6567503
nice kitty cat
>>
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Drew my rolled OC
I like her
>>
>>6567525
That's a fucking six pack you degenerate imbecile
>>
>>6567563
poofy lapel
I like her
>>
>>6567555

I'm just saying, when people want something verified legally, they 'get it in writing'. Saying you're not asking for it while you are, in fact, literally asking for it, just seems a little... Stupid?

I think that's a stupid shirt and she should probably stick to something that just implies sexuality instead of being so blunt about it, basically.
>>
High levels of comf is this thread, great work fellas.
>>
>>6567563
I like a character with attitude.

Story/job/etc?
>>
>>6567550
ASMR?
>>
>>6567526
To me there's two different 80's feels out there. Products of their era, and products of nostalgia.

The neon colored, warm tempoed flash of arcade throwback and cool digital reality feels like a manufactured 80's ideology to me. It's definitely what you think when you imagine the decade, but not the actual product it gave to you.

The other one though feels more real to me. When you see products that look like a drugged out pop star shouted the ideas into a walkman and then some equally coked out business executives through caution to the wind in favor of doing something "fucking awesome." That's the 80's to me.

Less Drive, Blood Dragon and Hotline Miami, more Heavy Metal, Thriller and Blade Runner
>>
>>6567572
Thanks!

>>6567589
Rich, rich family. Snooty and entitled; Works in the Canal District overseeing a shipping company (Doesn't actually do much herself though).
>>
>>6567583
source of image?
>>
>>6567622
>Rich, rich family. Snooty and entitled; Works in the Canal District overseeing a shipping company (Doesn't actually do much herself though).
>Character with a tremendous amount of flaws
I fooking love her. She has an Inky vibe to her.
>>
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>>6567550
>>6567600

The Fan of my computer.
>>
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>>6567629
Sorry, I didn't keep track.
>>
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I have a serious problem
>>
>>6566670
>全てイメージですよ!
This image has everything!
>ガミガミなでるっぽい
Looks like he's annoyed by the rubbing
>かわいいーねー
Sky(e): "You're awfully cute, huh---"
>That entire bottom right corner
Incomprehensible technological gibberish, just leave as is
>スカイの設計語が全くわからないジャック
Jack doesn't understand Sky(e)'s technical language
>>
>>6567563
>>6567622
She'll fit right in.
...we're going to lewd the fuck out of her, fair warning.

>>6567676
>Marty in the background
Gek
>>
>>6565509
He sees her as his rock, the reason to come back from a mission. The world may end, but as long as he has her he's happy. She has a sligthly maternal behavior towards him, taking care of his machines and him when as both often take a beating.
>>
>>6567647
>>6567684
In that case, I'll finish the pic
>>
>>6567676
take the final step

draw her milking him
>>
>>6567711
I don't really enjoy drawing full-blown pornography, teasing stuff is way more fun.
>>
>>6567676
C U C K E D

Just would like to point out, in that comic you posted before, you forgot to "color" in her ear- and tailtips in the third panel.
>>
>>6567720
Weaver's gonna love you
>>
>>6567720
b-but your art is so hot...
>>
>>6567578
She's an idiot but don't stoop to her level of arguing semantics. Let stupid people waste their time doing that
>>
>>6567503
It is ok.
>>
>>6567676
who the fcuk are youuuuuuu
>>
>>6567720

You might be surprised.Some of the full-blown porn around here is MAD comfy. Stick around and you might find a style you do like.
>>
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>>6567720
>teasing stuff is way more fun
MY HERDMATE
>>
>>6567498
>>6567578
Anon, by law you can not consent to a felony being committed against you. That's settled precedent for hundreds of years.
>>
>>6567421
Like Lyla?

That sounds like a classic name.

>>6567509
>Madame Ly

I LOVE it!
>btw Inky, I totally imagined teh bouncer of the establishment are Lionesses and Hyenas

I could see this.
>>
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>>6567762
see: Nameless Lewder
>>
>>6567676
>>6567684
Well duh, it's his bedroom
>>
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>>6567762
Don't get me wrong, I love seeing other people draw it, but I just find drawing teasing stuff more fun. Not to say that I haven't drawn it myself, I've found my niche.

http://middry.tumblr.com/

Here's some of my other art and miscelaneous stuff, only one zootopia thing on there I think.
>>
>>6567818

Just draw more pack street shipping, and you'll fit RIGHT in.

Say, who would you ship Marty with, if anyone?
>>
>>6567828
I ship Marty and books
>>
>>6567839

Erotic books?
...Do you think Marty likes reading old-fashioned hardcover erotica? Or sappy romances?
>>
>>6567828
I ship Marty and Martha
>>
>>6567849

...Who?
>>
>>6567828
I don't ship marty with anyone. His sister though....
>>
>>6567846
Marty likes to curl up with classic literature and dissect them until he cries

That's how he gets off

Marty a cute
>>
>>6567861

But who DO you ship his sister with, anon?
>>
>>6567818
Could we at least talk you into the occasional lewd?
>>
>>6567784

It's decided then! Madame Lyla/Ly for short.

So in what ways is she motherly?
>>
>>6567866
Al, V doesn't understand or love him. She just loves the idea of a somber pred boyfriend. While Martina is filled with the purest of loves.
>>
>>6567273
>>
>>6567877

second.
but teases are good too.
>>
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>>6567720
>I don't really enjoy drawing full-blown pornography, teasing stuff is way more fun.
>>
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>>6567909
yesss
>>
So with the day of my birth coming to an end, I thought I'd share some of the gift art I received from some of you wonderful people.
>>
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>>6567920
>>
>>6567897
This is a good fox
>>
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>>6567933
>>
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>>6567938
>>
>>6567785
NL you are missed.
>>6567802
DEEPEST LORE
>>6567897
Thanks for the request, nobbo.
[spoiler]did you base the vibrator off your dragon dildo?[/spoilerthatowrksonslothsonly]
>>6567909
>>6567911
Ah shit, here he is.
>>
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>>6567621
>>6567621
I can dig it. I like both the true products of the 70's and the nostalgia!80's stuff, to be honest.

The Nostalgia!80's is just so shiny and neon, and personally i LOVE that asthetic, so i guess thats why i gravitate towards it more then the "Actual" 80's stuff, which, if im remembering my 80's movies , generally tended to be dark and gritty.. course, that could just be because i mostly watched those dark and gritty movies, ala Escape From New York, the aforementioned Blade Runner, and stuff like The Thing, T2 and Aliens.
>>
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>>6567889
She likely treats her employees like family, at least her on the level ones. I'd argue she'd try to be the cool mom, but I think in truth she just uses her wisdom and experience to give advice when needed.

She's likely lenient and understanding in some circumstances too. Despite that she tries to run a legitimate business.

Mostly.
>>
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>>6567944
You people have all been really, incredibly awesome, and I can't think of any other fandom I've been so proud to be a part of.
Thank you all.

...Oh, and also my closest RL friend recently learned about my zoosona and gave me this for my birthday.
The hoodie was hand-made.
>>
>>6567977
how uh

how much for a life-sized one
>>
>>6567954
no
I just drew a rectangle lmao

I got a nova
>>
>>6567911
Sup weavs. New Packstreet when? Also hows the holiday season treating you?
>>
>>6567996
Hmm... That's a tough question...

I suppose starting price would be kidnapping Mead and forcing him to adapt Stoutwell into a full-length comic.
>>
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>>6568031
Cutie badger, you got some more junk mail.
>>
>>6568051
That's not junkmail! That's a precious baby girl!

Okay it's actually junkmail.
>>
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>>6567897
s-sweet jesus
>>
>>6567897
fuggin' hell
>>
>>6566766
Going Top to bottom, right to left

>「ジャックはまだまだおこちゃまなのよ」
"Jack's still an immature person"
>全部個人的な妄想です。
This is entirely my own personal fantasy. (TN: This is a note from the author)
>女だろ、ちゃんとキレイにしろよ
Jack: "You're a woman, so you need to look really pretty."
>要するにジャック萌えを求めている。ジャックも何も設定ないけど。。。
In short, I'm looking for more moe Jack. But there's nothing firmly established about him...
>怒るとコワそう
She looks scary when she's mad
>まだまだ子供扱い
She still treats him like a child
>いーじゃん、別に~
Sky(e): It's fiine, there's no reason~"
>お茶目なネエさん
Mischievous older sister
>「オレ」とか言っちゃいそう
(TN: This is hard to convey since English doesn't have gender-specific greetings, but essentially it says Skye would refer to herself as "Ore" which is considered masculine)
>仕事中は来るなってあれほど。。。!!
Jack: "What would cause you to visit me on the job...!!"
>何か修理してほしいモンあればなおしにげるヨ
Sky(e): "I wanted to repair something, so if you have any problems I'll fix it for you!"
>>
>>6568073
I like this.
>>
>>6568073
>In short, I'm looking for more moe Jack. But there's nothing firmly established about him...
You heard him, folks. Make more Jack.
>>
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>>6568103
Well he is a sweet bun boi
>>
>>6568051
>>6568062
B-b-but I already have one...

...Except with boy parts.
>>
>>6568073

BTW: The order in the bottom left goes:

Jack: "What would cause you to visit me on the job...!!"

Sky(e): It's fiine, there's no reason~"

Sky(e): "I wanted to repair something, so if you have any problems I'll fix it for you!"
>>
>>6567966
Oh believe you me I love the pagentry of the presented 80's as well, but it feels a bit clear cut to me.

Dark and grim 80's was edgy, but not for the sake of controversy, but because they knew it's what sold. There was an air of "hardcore" to almost everything, ranging from grit to downright insanity, and I love all of it. Escape From New York is another great example as you mentioned. Gotta also have love for the Mad Max series
>>
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Unbridled degeneracy doodles
>>
>>6568120
Sorry sweetie Badger, once you accept some junk mail the spammers just go crazy mailing you more. I highly doubt this will be the last..
>>
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>>6567889
well, I'd imagine as a non-abusive madame, she'd try to run a business first but not leaving her employees needs or wants out of the table
as for motherly feelings, maybe due to her lot in life, she never had pups of her own, she could take in fresh-of-the-boat migrants (for hyenas and the like), runaways or regular mammals who're trying to make a living
I mean, those previous pictures of her paint her more like that one aunt/ cougar neighbour who will tell you something's risky or dangerous, but won't make you it (and may entice you anyway)
>>
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>>6568140
Fucking bless you.
>>
>>6568140

Such a talented, prolific arter.

With taste, too! I like them, can we keep them?
>>
>>6568113
Or a girl
>>
>>6568162
No that is a free range artist, would probably not flourish in a caged environment.
>>
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>>6568180
Eh...
>>
>>6566912
That's...that means a lot for me to hear, dude

If you ever need a blowjob, hit me up
>>
>>6568140

oh my
that little remote of Charlie's seems to be


*particularly effective* on our favorite Cormo sheep judging from those leg shakes

i give him ten, fifteen seconds before he creams his pants before he can even touch himself.
>>
Hey Joker! How goes it?
>>
Do I matter?

Not trying to sound dismal. Just feeling blue. Figure this is the best time to ask.
>>
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>>6568141
Oh. Well if that's the case...
I suppose Beaver Jr. could use a sibling.

I'm curious what Inky thinks about these skunks of hers accumulating in my household.
>>
>>6568140

well, the general consensus in the discord seems to be 'damn, who's this?' and 'hope they stick around'

we seem to like yo,u mysterious artist.
>>
>>6568254

please. Those are skunkets.

They're barely a skunk to begin with.
>>
>>6568140
Please stay.
>>
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>>6568254
I don't mind it. As long as they're going to loving homes.

(Besides the girl was a gag baby of Hugh's left on Percy's doorstep as junkmail.)
>>
>>6568254
Well you're probably a better father than their biological duna donor.
>>
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>>6568130
Yea, Mad Max was amazing. And I completely agree that the "hardcore" feel was there. The products of the 80's seem like They always featured the heroes as "hard boiled" so to speak. They did what needed to be done with no grandstanding and crap. Robocop was grittier then i remembered, since i recently watched it. Terminator was grim and grimey and the Running Man was also schlocky and crazy fun.
>>
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>>6568262
That reminds me; I gotta shop around for some beds and mattresses for the little scamps before the couch gets too crowded for them.
>>
>>6568253
You matter to me! thought you're probably not a cc it doesn't matter! I bet you were one of those lovely anons that always has something nice to say about me when I' feeling blue as well! Without you a precious piece of the comf will be lost.
>>
>>6568303
Regardless of who I am, I really needed to hear that.

Thank you fellow anon. Thank you so much.
>>
>>6568253
Yes. You Matter.
>>
>>6568253
You absolutely matter!
>>
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>>6568223
Charlie's the kind of fox who would keep him on the edge of the seat for weeks
>>
>>6568299
It was a pretty solid era for entertainment, definitely deserves the reverence that it gets, although that's with a bit of cherry picking of course.

Still, easy to get excited when a classic grim-dark 80's film speaks to you.
>>
>>6568349

that's PRETTY FUCKING HOT, desu.

I really, really, really hope they stay. Maybe I ought to write them a new charlie fic soon...
>>
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>>6568299
Ah man I haven't watched the running man in forever! Time to go find it.
>>
>>6568297
I dunno, he has some good genes.
The ass in those jeans ain't bad either.

>>6568294
Of course it's a loving home; Zootopia Equivalent Cheerios and Zootopia Equivalent Sesame Street every morning.
>>
>>6568403
What if the ICP gene isn't dormant? Do you have the parenting skills to save them?
>>
>>6568332
>>6568347
Thank you.

I really needed to hear this.

I genuinely appreciate it.
>>
>>6568253
shut up crow
>>
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>>6568423
Well if that's a possibility, I'm sure I can wean them onto decent rap/hiphop like Cypress Hill or the Wutang Clan and work from there.
>>
>>6568253
>>6568463

Second
>>
>>6568403
Then it's all gravy!

>>6568423
Considering one of them IS Hugh, I think he's doomed.
>>
>>6568473
Good luck, I hope things work out for them. Be as good a papa as I know you can be Mr Badger.
>>
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>>6568103
Okay.
>>
>>6568463
>>6568478
Who?
>>
>>6568486
>Then it's all gravy!

Ew. Who puts gravy on Cheerios?
>>
>>6568491
Great work!
>>
>>6568253
No, not at all, in any regard.

But that doesn't mean you should give up.
>>
>>6565539
>>6565455
I'd be more than happy to work with an anon on updating the CC section of the ThreadJournal
>>
>>6568486
If he's doomed then at least he has a backup skunket. But who knows, Hugh now has a very cute and responsible badger figure in his life at an early age, perhaps things will go better.
>>
>>6568513
Honestly, I didn't feel like giving up until I read this.
>>
>>6568491
I do love the bun boi, thank you pretty line maker!
>>
>>6568523
But anon, he's barely a badger.

...I said "he's barely a badger".

...Oh well.
>>
>>6568530
But if you don't matter, why give up? Keep going. No reason not to.
>>
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>>6568352
Definitely. Part of the reason i like Shadowrun. 80's era cyberpunk made into an entire world.
>>
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>>6568549
Do not bully badgers! They are wholesome and lovable creatures, majestic even.
>>
>>6565570
Nick finding himself in a bunny orgy
>>
>>6568575
Majestically lewd
>>
>>6568550
I feel the opposite.

If I don't matter then I have no reason to go on.

I know 4chan's not the place to go for validation or asspats and I'm an autist for asking if I matter on a Norwegian soil tilling board, but I was hoping for

Fuck it. You're right. I don't matter.
>>
>>6568588
They can be, yes.
>>
>>6568599
What's a nio?
>>
>>6568595
You gotta look at it from a more objective point of view.

In a way, you don't matter, none of us do. We're anonymous jerks posting on a message board for a family animated movie with talking animals most of us want to fuck.

But in a broader sense, you have total freedom. No one is judging you, no one is ruling your life, no one is controling you.

And all you'll get from us is love, because we love that you're here.

You may not matter to us personally, but collectively, you're here, and you can do anything.
>>
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>>6568611
Was supposed to be a bun bois but I messed it up. I am sorry badgers and buns everywhere.
>>
>>6568253
You matter to your friends, colleagues, family, etc.
>>
Badgers are best
>>
>>6568622
That's really fucking beautiful man.

I want to think I matter to someone, but I think I measure worth based on what I CAN do for people, instead of just what I DO.

Thanks.

>>6568648
I'm sure I do. I hope I do.
>>
>>6568651
>badger cucks joker
badgers confirmed for best
>>
>>6568654
Exactly.

You need to matter to yourself before you can matter to others.


And if you truely believe you don't matter, then you can live wihtout consequence, and find a reason to matter.
>>
>>6568651
Badgers: better than autists.
>>
Whelp, chummers, its time for me to sleep. C'ya Later /ztg!
>>
>>6568697
Have a good night.
>>
>>6568697
Sleep tight, bunner!
>>
Mods are on point tonight.
>>
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>>6567316
yeet

last one for tonight, I'm pretty tired
>>
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>>6568736
Joker tends to come in waves.
I hope they can defeat wave 2. Or 3. Here is hoping.
>>
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>>6568743
Sloth buddy, you get a good rest and have a happy dream.
>>
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>>6568736
Wow they really are. Thank you mods! Be warned though the guy switches IPs like a fiend...
>>
>>6568743
CUTE!
CUTE!
>>
>>6568743
>Black Sheep Betty
>the horniest little ewe on Flock Street

Pred/Prey switched AU when?
>>
>>6568743
I fucking loves this nobbo.
>>
>>6568743
You are a very cute sloth, I hope you have plenty of snacks and a nice warm place to rest.

Awesome pic btw!
>>
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Oh neat, I figured I'd have to wait until the next thread. Colored my rolled OC

No name yet.
>>
Thanks mods
>>
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>>6568743
And have a good night Nob.
>>
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>>6568151
>>6567889
>>6567784
This convo reminded me of this:
http://www.economist.com/news/obituary/21679162-cynthia-payne-brothel-keeper-and-exposer-britains-sexual-hypocrisies-died-november-15th
>>
>>6568770
(Since my joke failed with Inky...)

Is she a cougar that happens to be a cougar?
>>
BIDEN: I would end the war in Iraq and immediately move to defuse the possible war in Iran and immediately defuse what's going on, on the Korean Peninsula.
They're the three most important things that the next president is going to have to deal with.
And by the way, when power is handed from this president to the next, the next president is going to be left with no margin for error. They better be smarter than their advisers.
BLITZER: Congressman Kucinich, what would be your top priority?
KUCINICH: Keep in mind, we could stop that war in Iraq now by not providing any funding. But what I intend to do is to be a president who helps to reshape the world for peace -- to work with all the leaders of the world in getting rid of all nuclear weapons, rejecting policies that create war as an instrument of diplomacy, making sure that we cause the nations of the world to come together for fair trade, cancel NAFTA, cancel the WTO, go back to bilateral trade conditioned on workers rights and human rights, create a not- for-profit health care system (inaudible) a Congress.
BLITZER: Very quickly, Senator Gravel and then Senator Dodd, but very quickly: Your top priority?
GRAVEL: Top priority is to turn to these people and say they are part of the leadership right now in the Congress. They could end the war if they want to. All they've got to do is show the leadership and they will...
(CROSSTALK)
BLITZER: Senator Dodd, very quickly. We've got five seconds.
DODD: Well, I'd kind of restore the constitutional rights in our country. This administration has done great damage to them. I would do that on the first day. I wouldn't wait 100 days on those issues.
BLITZER: We've got to leave it right there. We're going
END
>>
Hey /ztg/ guess what

I'm 25, still living at home, working a job I hate, still loaded with debt even though I've spent two years paying it off, nowhere near the shape I want to be in, chronically exhausted, at least 300 miles from all my friends, and even though I constantly try to fix all of this, I am currently drinking my problems away because I didn't know what else to do.

And I am here every god damn night, because you fuckers are so comfortable for some reason I can't help but stop by. I love the art and the greentexts and the comradery and all the bullshit along with these threads.

Thanks.
>>
But, the single greatest responsibility of the next president is to travel the world, speak to the world about what real American values are -- equality, diversity -- and to lead an effort by America to re-establish our alliances around the world, which is going to require time and focus.
And then, third, to lead in taking action that demonstrates that America is strong but that America is also moral and just. And we're going to help other people in the world and we're going to demonstrate our commitment to humanity.
All those things...
BLITZER: All right.
EDWARDS: ... are crucial to re-establishing our moral authority.
BLITZER: I want to go very quickly to everyone.
What would be, Senator , your top priority in the first 100 days?
: Well, if President Bush has not ended the war in Iraq, to bring our troops home. That would be the very first thing that I would do.
(APPLAUSE)
BLITZER: All right.
Senator Obama?
OBAMA: That would be the number one priority, assuming nothing has changed. The second priority is getting moving on health care because that's something that we can get done, I think, very quickly.
BLITZER: All right.
Governor Richardson?
RICHARDSON: Nobody's talked about your profession, education.
I would upgrade our schools. I would have preschool for every American, full-day kindergarten.
I would pay our teachers what they deserve. I'd have a minimum wage for our teachers, $40,000. I did that in New Mexico. We went from 49th to 29th.
I would bring science and math academies to get America more competitive. I would emphasize the arts. I would emphasize civics. Again, science and math.
I would have universal education...
BLITZER: Thank you.
RICHARDSON: ... available for every American.
BLITZER: Thank you, Governor.
Senator Biden, your top priority in the first 100 days?
>>
>>6568787
SHE'S NOT EVEN A FEMALE, ANON
>>
>>6568791
Thank you for helping keep this community alive.
>>
Because we're looking at a process here in Washington that most of the American public isn't aware of. And that is, these interest groups have such a hold on our country that right now they're headed to grab the oil of Iraq, using our troops. Right now, they're keeping a not-for-profit health-care system in its place. Right now, they're keeping NAFTA in its place. I'm talking about a real change here that gives the American people a chance to recover their country totally and by moving away from the interest groups...
BLITZER: All right.
KUCINICH: ... that unfortunately support some of my dear friends.
BLITZER: Senator Biden?
BIDEN: Ten seconds. If you want to do away with the interest groups, go to public financing of elections. Let's cut through all this malarkey.
(APPLAUSE)
BIDEN: That is the bottom line. As long as there are massive contributions pouring into the system, you're going to get these earmarks in the middle of the night that have nothing to do with the people's interest.
So you want to do this, reform the system. Make a public financing system. That will change the earmarks.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Let's go back to Jennifer.
VAUGHN: OK, Wolf.
We have Ivy Merrill with us tonight. You are a substitute elementary schoolteacher.
QUESTION: Yes, I am.
VAUGHN: What's your question tonight?
QUESTION: Well, thank you for being here.
Given that the circumstances in this country and in our world were essentially the same when you take office, what would be your top priority for your first 100 days?
BLITZER: Senator Edwards?
EDWARDS: To travel the world, re-establish America's -- I think my mike just came on -- re-establish America's moral authority in the world, which I think is absolutely crucial. The other things become less important and subservient.
We have huge issues here at home. We've talked about some of them tonight -- energy, global warming, what we do about the issue of health care in unfo
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>>6568770
This is a hot as fuck lioness.

>>6568787
Sorry about that anon.
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>>6568770
I can see you fitting in quite nicely here.
Do you do stories as well? Or do you consider yourself an artist first and foremost?
>>
to come in for a briefing. I went in for a briefing. He said there was only two other people that came in for a briefing. What the briefing he told us is that we have a fiscal gap on the order of $50 trillion. And you're hearing all this money's going to be spent to do all these great things? My God, don't believe a word of it. Follow the money.
You can't get all this money coming at you, millions of dollars from all the special interests, and think that they're now going to deal with solving the problems with special interests. Won't happen.
BLITZER: All right.
Senator ?
: Well, I think it's important to remember that six years ago we had a balanced budget and a surplus.
(APPLAUSE)
And we did that the old-fashioned way, by cutting spending and raising revenues. There is no free lunch. We're going to have to do that hard work again.
Now, my point is, when it comes to the tax questions that were asked, the benefits from the Bush tax cuts have gone disproportionately to a very small percentage of Americans. And 10 percent of Americans have realized about 50 percent of the increase in wealth that has happened in this country in the last six years.
We need to deal with the burden on the middle class. The alternative minimum tax has to be reformed, hopefully eventually eliminated.
But I think it's important to point out that we have done this before -- not in ancient history, but within our memory. And we can do it again once we have a Democratic president.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
(APPLAUSE)
We're going to go back to Jennifer in a second. But I know Congressman Kucinich really wants to weigh in.
GRAVEL: Listen, they've been raiding the Social Security trust fund to $200 million a year, and they're all involved in this.
Now what do they say about -- you balanced the budget by raiding the Social Security fund to $200 million a year. And they're doing it now.
BLITZER: Congressman Kucinich, you want to respond to him?
KUCINICH: I do.
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>>6568791
Good shit

Fag
>>
Well, listen, first of all, as president, we ought to be discouraging that behavior, because it is a problem. Clearly, the budget is getting out of control as a result of those practices.
But I wouldn't want to have a blanket approach to that. There may be some critical issues that occur -- events like Katrina and other events -- where the Congress needs to respond, you haven't gone through the process before. I wouldn't want to put us in that kind of a rigid straitjacket.
But, clearly, when you're going beyond that, we need to have more discipline in the process.
I've been a long-time supporter -- offered the first, one of the first pay-as-you-go budgets back some 23 years ago in the United States Senate -- the question that came up earlier about specific policies and ideas.
I think, with rare exceptions you ought to be able to have accounting for either the tax cut or the spending program and pay for them.
We've gone on too long allowing for these things to build and grow, and the deficits are a problem. Dennis is right: $2.2 trillion of public debt being held outside the country.
The good news is that the Chinese are buying it. The bad news is the Chinese are buying it, because it puts us in a very disadvantageous position when it comes to arguing against currency manipulation.
So getting better control of our fiscal policies -- our fiscal policies ought to reflect our moral values. Our fiscal policies ought to be fair. They ought to be practical. They ought to be pro-growth. And they ought to be responsible.
BLITZER: Senator...
DODD: That's not happening when you have earmarks year-in and year-out and not having the kind of influence that would eliminate them except in those rare circumstances where you may need to have them.
BLITZER: Is it time to do away with these earmarks?
GRAVEL: Totally, totally. It's abominable, and the only way you're going to get rid of it is to give the give the president a line-item veto. Wha
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>>6568791
Man, I feel you, anon. This place is pretty great. Thanks for bein' a part.
>>
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>>6568798
Ah, yes.
Something new to not live down.
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>>6568805
Hey! You only get a smoke break if you happen to catch fire, get back to work space wizard cowboy!
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>>6568787
She's not quite old enough to be a cougar; I picture her in her late 20's to mid 30's. Also she's a lion.

>>6568805
Aw, thanks! I enjoyed drawing her.
>>
Congressman Kucinich, you know the Republicans will say what they're hearing, by and large, tonight is more Democrats suggesting raise taxes, raise spending, more of the same, the big tax, big spending party.
What do you say to them?
KUCINICH: I'm saying that we should not be borrowing money from China to run a war in Iraq. We need to change our spending policies in many ways.
First of all, stop war. Most of the people on this stage voted consistently to fund a war we should have never gotten into in the first place.
Change our trade laws. We need to get out of NAFTA and the WTO and go back to bilateral trade, conditioned on worker's rights, human rights and the environment and stop driving an $800 ion trade deficit.
We need to have health care for all, all Americans, in a not-for- profit health care system.
That's going to help the gentleman with his beauty salon and his small business, when you have a chance to have health care at a fraction of what you're paying now and everything's covered.
And then finally, environment: I say we can create millions of new jobs with a new WGA (ph), inspiring technologies for wind and solar and insulation on a domestic basis.
We can create new wealth. I want to create new wealth and I want to stop wasting the money where we're wasting it or losing the wealth in our trade policies.
BLITZER: Thank you, Congressman.
Jennifer, you have an e-mail question.
VAUGHN: Yes, Wolf, if I may. This e-mail question is from our WMUR gather.com blogger.
The question is: Democrats have vowed to weed out corruption in the federal government. A major source of corruption for both Democrats and Republicans are bribes in spending s, sometimes referred to as earmarks.
Would you vow, if elected president, to veto all s containing earmarks?
And, Wolf, earmarks -- the pork spending that sometimes gets added to legislation without anybody really knowing about it.
BLITZER: Well, let's ask Senator Dodd. What a t that? Would you agree to give up ea
>>
College for everyone is something we've actually, Elizabeth and I, put in place in eastern North Carolina, in a small community in eastern North Carolina, and the idea is really simple. The idea is, if a kid graduates from high school qualified to be in college and they commit to work when they're there at least 10 hours a week, their tuition and books are paid for.
And the idea is, we want to make it simple for kids to go to college. They have to work for it. We don't just give it to them. And then, on top of that, so many young people are faced with this crushing burden of debt when they graduate from college. I think it's something we shouldn't just be doing -- we've done this privately in this small area of eastern North Carolina...
BLITZER: All right.
EDWARDS: ... but it's something we ought to be doing all across this country, college for everyone.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Jennifer, go ahead.
VAUGHN: This is Gregory Camann (ph), and Gregory lived in Bedford, and he used to own a hair salon. I'm going to reach around you and have you ask your question.
QUESTION: Our country's now running huge federal deficits again. I'm wondering, one, do the candidates have a problem with that? And if they do, what policies would they pursue, if they became president, to alleviate that problem?
And if you could be somewhat specific. Would you be looking for the income side, and what would those policies be, or would you be looking to the spending side, and talk a little bit about those policies. Thank you.
BLITZER: Governor Richardson?
RICHARDSON: Well, I'm a governor. I have balanced five budgets. I have to as a governor. In the administration -- I want to thank the senator for her nice words -- we had a balanced budget and created 20 million jobs. This is what I would do: $100 million from the war in Iraq spent on domestic needs.
Number two, I am for a constitutional amendment to balance the budget, a line-item veto a hat the Congress has.
>>
>>6568818
Hey. HEY.

You're cute, I like you.
>>
>>6568808
I like to think I can write decently, and have gotten good feedback from ideas I've pitched to friends; haven't really tried writing a full story, though.
>>
BLITZER: Senator Obama, what is a definition of rich?
OBAMA: Well, the definition that I'm using with respect to paying for my health care plan is those making over $250,000 a year.
Keep in mind that all we're talking about is going back to the tax levels, the marginal tax rates that existed when was in office. So we're not talking about going back to huge marginal rates.
OBAMA: But you tell a larger story that I hear as I travel all across the country. And that is that folks are feeling hit from all sides. They're trying to save for the next generation's education. They're trying to save for their own retirement. In some cases, they're looking after an aging parent. Gas prices are hitting them.
And one of the things that we've seen in our economy is that the burdens and benefits of this new global economy are not being spread evenly across the board. And that's why as the next president, one of my first priorities is to make sure that we institute some fairness in the system. We institute in our tax code.
BLITZER: All right.
OBAMA: We institute it with respect to making sure that Social Security is preserved.
We institute it in giving working people an opportunity to save where they don't have it right now.
OBAMA: And we make sure that, as Chris said -- I think Chris made an excellent point -- that college education is simply too expensive at this point.
BLITZER: So give us a number, Senator Obama. At what number would you tell us that there is lower taxes, at what number people can afford higher taxes?
OBAMA: I'm sorry. I don't understand the question.
BLITZER: Income at $200,000 a year? $150,000 a year?
OBAMA: As I said before, I would roll back the Bush tax cuts for those making over $250,000. In some cases, I'd like to see lower taxes. When I was in the state legislature, one of the things that I introduced was a state earned income ta point is not how do I tax people.
But I wan
>>
That will give you an incentive to move forward and do something about education in this country.
BLITZER: Congressman Kucinich, should there be mandatory service for young people after they finish high school?
KUCINICH: I would take the approach that John F. Kennedy took when he said, "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country," and inspire young people to want to serve.
And want to serve not only in the military, which is honorable service, but also to serve in helping to clean up our environment. Also to serve in tutoring children and helping the elderly and working in hospitals.
There are so many different ways that we can encourage you to serve. To make it mandatory loses the point. People want to love America again. And when you have a president who will inspire the young people, they'll want to get involved.
BLITZER: Is it time, Senator Dodd, as Congressman Charlie Rangel recommends, to bring back the military draft?
DODD: I don't think so, Wolf, at all. I served as a Peace Corps volunteer back in the 1960s, an American -- of course, I've been asked a million times why did I join the Peace Corps. And I did so because an American president asked me to. He asked a generation of us to be part of something larger than ourselves.
DODD: Some went off to join Vista; some got out into the civil rights movement; others went into the military; others went to the Justice Department. It was a very exciting time to be alive.
But today, in the world we're living in today, I don't think we need to go a draft at all. We don't need the numbers of people in the service.
But I like the idea, what we've tried to do with AmeriCorps and other things, to provide the kind of financial relief.
This young man is finishing high school. He's assumably going to go on to higher education.
I hope you are.
Looking at the staggering costs, the ripoffs that are occurring with people manipulating through de ould be a valuable way of
>>
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>>6568821
Fine, fine!

>>6568824
With how expressive and lively the piece looks, I had a feeling you had fun drawing her. I don't know if that sounds weird, but I'm happy to hear it.

>>6568833
Well thanks anon. Gives me the warm fuzzies!
>>
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>>6568770

Oh, how wonderful. Another rich bitch!

Hello and welcome!
>>
BLITZER: I want to go back to Jennifer, but I have to ask Governor Richardson, you're a former ambassador at the United Nations, and what I hear you saying, what you're saying is that you would consider the United States boycotting the Summer Olympic Games in China unless China starts getting tough with the government in Sudan.
RICHARDSON: Yes, I would. Because China purchases a lot of their oil -- most of it, a good part of it -- from Sudan.
And my view is that they are a leverage point. And they have not been strong on the Sudan.
We don't need, Joe -- with all due respect -- another military involvement. Iraq is enough. And we must get out of Iraq.
What we need to do is move forward with the toughest options. Am I for a no-fly zone? Yes. I think we need strong economic sanctions. And we lack the moral authority to build international coalitions, to fight genocide in Darfur. We should shut down -- I would as first day as president, I would shut down Guantanamo. I would shut down Abu Ghraib and secret prisons. That is the moral authority that we don't have.
BLITZER: Hold on one second.
The audience is anxious for another question from out here.
Jennifer?
VAUGHN: Tim O'Connor is anxious.
VAUGHN: You're about to graduate from high school.
QUESTION: Yeah.
VAUGHN: Are you eligible, now, to vote, for the first time, in the New Hampshire primary?
QUESTION: I am. I'm 18 now.
VAUGHN: What's your question tonight?
QUESTION: Well, on a little bit lighter note, I spent last summer in Germany with a family whose oldest son was completing his one-year mandatory service to his country.
I was wondering if you think we should have that; and if so, how you plan to make it happen?
BLITZER: All right.
Senator Gravel, let me ask you that question.
GRAVEL: And obviously, I filibustered to force th
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>>6568801
>>6568811
>>6568816
Sorry
>>
BLITZER: Hold on one second. What about that idea, Senator Dodd, about possibly boycotting the Beijing Summer Olympic games if China doesn't use its influence to stop the genocide in Sudan?
DODD: I think that goes too far, Wolf. Here, look. This is a major issue.
DODD: There are ways of dealing with this. We're not only going to elect a president in November of 2008. We're going to elect, arguably, the most important, if not the most important, leader in the world.
And it's going to be critically important that we use the tools available to us to exercise the influence we'd like on China, on Russia and other nations to be more cooperative and participate in solving some of these problems here.
That's going to require real leadership based on experience that knows how to bring people together -- certainly, reminding the Chinese of the importance of this issue -- utilizing those tools that are available to us.
But the idea that you go in and stop the Olympics from happening I don't think gets you there. I think that's more likely to delay the kind of influence and support China ought to be providing.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards?
EDWARDS: Actually, I disagree with my friend, Chris Dodd, about that. I think that we should use whatever tools available to us.
And I have to say to Senator Biden, Governor Richardson, I applaud their being so vocal and out there on this issue. It's enormously important.
But I think all of us recognize that this is a piece of a bigger puzzle, which is America no longer has the moral authority to lead in the world.
EDWARDS: Watching a genocide continue has contributed to that, but it is not the only thing. The spread of HIV/AIDS, I think America ought to actually lead an effort to make primary school education available to 100 million children in the world who desperately need it, including in Africa...
BLITZER: We're going to go back to Jennifer.
But g
BLITZER: If yo essary.
BIDEN: Wolf, the reason we have no moral
>>
Reminder to anyone new:

Click the arrow on the first Joker post and report it. Mods are flagged by number of reports, so the more piled onto a single post, the faster it gets their attention.

He'll lose steam soon enough. He takes out his frustration on these threads because of personal beefs with certain CCs.
>>
>>6568854
Don't apologize, man. We're happy to have you. Thanks for being honest.
>>
: Are we talking about a no-fly zone...
EDWARDS: Wolf...
(CROSSTALK)
BLITZER: Hold on. Hold on.
(LAUGHTER)
(CROSSTALK)
BLITZER: This is an important issue. This is an important issue.
(CROSSTALK)
: Absolutely...
EDWARDS: Because you're talking about American troops.
: ... an apology.
(CROSSTALK)
BLITZER: ... no-fly zone, but very often, Senator , that could move on to other operations.
: Well, but, we're not going to engage in these hypotheticals. I mean, one of the jobs of a president is being very reasoned in approaching these issues. And I don't think it's useful to be talking in these kind of abstract, hypothetical terms.
RICHARDSON: Well, I was there...
(APPLAUSE)
: I think that's...
RICHARDSON: But I was there.
BLITZER: Governor, would you use force to save people in Darfur?
RICHARDSON: No, what I would do -- and I was there. I got a very fragile cease-fire put together there, three months ago.
And we made things a little better. I want with the Save Darfur Coalition.
This is what I would do. Number one, more U.N. peacekeepers. The government is refusing to make this happen.
Secondly, economic sanctions. We've imposed them, but they're weak. We need European countries to make them happen.
RICHARDSON: Third, we need China, to lean on China, which has enormous leverage over Darfur. And if the Chinese don't want to do this, we say to them, maybe we won't go to the Olympics. And lastly, what we need is a country, a foreign policy that cares about Africa, that cares that 300,000 human beings have died, have been massacred, that over 2 million have lost their homes.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: Gender-based violence, rape. America should care about Africa, and we don't.
(CROSSTALK)
(APPLAUSE)
>>
EDWARDS: And one danger that anyone has to recognize with the possible taking down of Musharraf as the president of Pakistan -- and I met with him also in Islamabad a few years ago -- one of the things we have to recognize is if he goes out of power, given the power of radical Islam in Pakistan, there's absolutely no way to know what kind of government will take its place.
BLITZER: And Pakistan's a nuclear power also.
Jennifer, go ahead.
VAUGHN: Jeff Turiel (ph) is here with us tonight.
You are a psychologist at Nashua High School. Would that be Nashua North?
QUESTION: Nashua North; that's correct.
VAUGHN: What's your question tonight?
QUESTION: I would like to address the crisis in Darfur. At this time, as many as 400,000 people have been killed, millions or more are without food and shelter. If you were elected president, would role do you think the United States should play in addressing this terrible tragedy?
BIDEN: Wolf?
BLITZER: Yes?
BIDEN: I just was there.
BLITZER: Go ahead, Senator.
BIDEN: You know, we have to stop talking about it. A lot of talk goes on about it. The United Nations has already said they're prepared to put in a 21,000 force, including the African Union.
BIDEN: In fact, you have in the capital of Sudan the government saying, "We're not going to allow that to happen." They have forfeited their sovereignty by engaging in genocide.
We should impose a no-fly zone if the U.N. will not move now. We should impose a no-fly zone, and we should commit 25,000 -- 2,500 NATO troops. You could take out the Janjaweed tomorrow.
I went there. I sat in the borders. I went in those camps. They're going to have thousands and thousands and thousands of people die. We've got to stop talking and act.
BLITZER: All right.
BIDEN: That's why last Monday I went to see the president of the United Nations at the General Assembly, as well as the secretary general, to make
>>
including Iran: Our presence in Iraq is weakening our capacity to deal with these issues and fanning anti-American sentiment in such a way that it makes it more difficult for Musharraf to work with us effectively.
If people in Pakistan believe that the U.S. is an occupying force, it makes us more subject to the kinds of difficulties that we're seeing in Pakistan today.
BLITZER: I want everybody to raise their hand and tell me: If you agree that if the U.S. had intelligence that could take out Osama bin Laden and kill him, even though some innocent civilians would die in the process, would you, as president, authorize such an operation?
BLITZER: If you would, raise your hand.
BIDEN: It would depend on how many innocent civilians...
: Yes, I mean, part of this is one of these hypotheticals, Wolf...
EDWARDS: There's not information, not enough information.
: ... that is very difficult to answer in the abstract.
You know, my husband actually tried to take out bin Laden. You know, he did fire missiles at a training camp that we had intelligence that that's where bin Laden was.
Because, by that time, bin Laden had already bombed our embassies; bin Laden had already demonstrated his hostility toward the United States.
But you can't just -- you have to be very careful about how you proceed.
So, you know, yes, if we could do it without a tremendous amount of collateral damage, I think, maybe with one or two exceptions, we would give the order to do it, knowing what a weighty responsibility that is.
BLITZER: All right. We're going to go on to the next question, from Jennifer.
Senator Edwards, you really want to weigh in.
EDWARDS: I just wanted to answer the original question that was asked, which was, how do you reconcile Musharraf being in power with our ideas of a liberal democracy?
And I think one o actually respect civil rights and individual liberties.
>>
>>6568791
You're a fucking treasure anon.

I'll root for you.
>>
>>6568845
Thanks so much! Glad you think it looks good c:

>>6568847
Hi! Thanks for the welcome!
>>
: And unfortunately when I got back and I called the White House and I made this suggestion, it fell on deaf ears.
So there's a lot we need to do. And it's a very difficult, thorny problem how to address it.
BLITZER: Congressman Kucinich, if you were president of the United States and the intelligence community said to you, "We know where Osama bin Laden is. He's in Pakistan. We've got the specific target. But he's only going to be there for 20 minutes," you've got to give the order yes or no to take him out with a Hellfire missile, but it's going to kill some innocent civilians at the same time: What would be your decision?
KUCINICH: I don't think that a president of the United States who believes in peace and who wants to create peace in the world is going to be using assassination as a tool.
KUCINICH: Because when you do that, it comes back at your country. And I think that Osama bin Laden, if he's still alive, ought to be held to account in an international court of law. And so should any other person who's been involved in a violation of international law which has resulted in the deaths of many people.
And so, I think that an America which has a strong stand morally in the world is an America that shows a way to get to peace. And an America that stands for peace is a strong country. So I would say to answer that question, I don't believe in assassination politics, and when you do that, you inevitably bring the assassination of our own leaders into play.
BLITZER: All right.
Senator Obama, you want to respond?
OBAMA: Well, I think Dennis is right. I don't believe in assassinations, but Osama bin Laden has declared war on us, killed 3,000 people, and under existing law, including international law, when you've got a military target like bin Laden, you take him out.
OBAMA: And if you have 20 minutes, you do it swiftly and surely.
And it's unfortunate that I think during the initial push into Afghanist with respect to both Pakistan and
>>
weapon on top of a missile that can strike. They are far away from that.
Number three, in fact, we have to understand how weak that government is. They import almost all of their refined oil. By 2014, they are going to be importing their crude oil. There are much better ways if we had to get to the point of real sanctions of doing economic sanctions on them forcefully that way. But at the end of the day, if they posed a missile, stuck it on a pad, I'd take it out.
BLITZER: Senator, thank you for that.
Let's go back to Jennifer.
VAUGHN: OK, well, thank you.
Matthew Mazer (ph), how are you?
QUESTION: Fine, thank you.
VAUGHN: You're faculty here.
QUESTION: Yeah, I'm a professor of history.
VAUGHN: And you live in Concord, New Hampshire?
QUESTION: I do.
VAUGHN: What is your question tonight?
QUESTION: A number of the candidates have talked about alliance- building. I want to ask about a specific country. The U.S. has had close relations with Pakistan as part of the war in Afghanistan and part of the war on terror.
QUESTION: How do you reconcile our security interests with Pakistan with our interest in promoting liberal democracy? Pakistan is not a democratic country.
BLITZER: Let's ask -- let's throw that question to Senator .
: Well, it's a really important question, because we have been supporting Pakistan through President Musharraf now for a number of years. And it is clear that he has not moved toward democracy, but has solidified his rule and become quite anti-democratic, with his removal of the chief justice and many of the other moves that he's taken.
At the same time, we depend upon him to try to control the tribal areas out of which come the resurgent Taliban and Al Qaida fighters who cross the border into Afghanistan.
Again, this is an area where I think the United with both President Karzai and President Musharraf.
: And I asked them if it would help to have a hi
>>
>>6568857
he usually deletes the first couple posts to get around this, best to just report one at random.
>>
to send weapons across their borders to be used against our young men and women.
And we need a process of engagement. You know, the president's policy has been, we don't talk in this administration to people we don't agree with or that we think are bad. All during the Cold War, we always talked to the Soviet Union.
They had missiles pointed at us. They had leaders who said they would bury us. They waged wars around the world. We never stopped talking.
In my administration, diplomacy, patient, careful diplomacy, the kind of diplomacy that Richardson did for my husband, that really gets people to stay with it over time.
: Are you always going to get good results? No. But you've got to start the process.
However, we still have to make it clear that Iran having a nuclear weapon is absolutely unacceptable. We have to try to prevent that at all costs.
(APPLAUSE)
But we need to start with diplomacy in order to see what we can accomplish.
BLITZER: So what happens, Senator, if diplomacy, when all is said and done, fails?
: Wolf, I'm not going to get into hypotheticals, because we've had an administration that doesn't believe in diplomacy. You know, they have every so often Condi Rice go around the world and show up some where and make a speech, and occasionally they even send Dick Cheney -- and that's hardly diplomatic in my view.
So from what I...
(LAUGHTER)
(APPLAUSE)
We won't know until we get a president who is committed to diplomacy and will do things like use the great diplomats that have come up y rallied for America on the str ol it; you ca ible president -- wou
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>>6567977
That's a fucking eggscellent doll, dawg!
(also nice dubs)
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>>6568886
Interesting. Are reports based on post, or IP?
>>
OBAMA: No.
BLITZER: ... before you read about them in The Washington Post?
OBAMA: No, we didn't. And I visited Walter Reed repeatedly.
Typically, what would happen is we would go to visit troops in the medical facility.
OBAMA: And people will acknowledge that the medical facility at Walter Reed does great work. Unfortunately, what it turned out was the outpatient facilities were disastrous. And that's why we now have legislation moving forward to make sure not only that we're just painting over some of the mold that was in there. But we're also making it easier for families and veterans to negotiate the system once they're outpatients.
BLITZER: All right.
Let's go back to Jennifer for another question.
VAUGHN: Wolf, thank you.
Hi, Polly (ph). You live in Hancock, New Hampshire. You're a retired legal secretary.
You have a question about Iran tonight. You lived there in the late '60s.
QUESTION: Yes. That's particularly the reason why I have the question about Iran.
I'd like to ask: How would you approach solving the problem we have Iran today? Would you use force or would you use diplomacy? And if you used diplomacy, what would you do?
BLITZER: All right, let's let Senator first respond to that.
: Well, I am very concerned about Iran. And I believe that we should have been using diplomacy for a number of years now.
: I am, I guess, pleased that the administration is starting to talk to the Iranians, but it is way overdue. We have allowed the Iranians to begin their nuclear program,
>>
GRAVEL: I get my meds from the V.A., so I know the situation quite well.
BLITZER: Are you satisfied or unsatisfied?
GRAVEL: I'm satisfied, very much so. I think they do a good job. But I think it is really somewhat appalling because the government has always, always waged war against the veterans.
I would suggest that Senator Obama, who's on the committee -- did they do any oversight work to find out before they read in The Washington Post that there was a scandal up the street at Walter Reed? I mean, what about that? Did they all get informed of that, or did you know it before?
OBAMA: Actually, we have done a lot of oversight trying to consistently force this administration to put money into the system that it has refused.
(CROSSTALK)
OBAMA: Let me finish, Mike.
The first year that I was on the V.A., myself, Senator Patty Murray, Senator Rockefeller and others tried to tell the administration you need an additional $2 ion in order to provide services to troops who were coming home.
The administration said, "No, you don't need it. We don't need it. Everything's covered."
Six months through, they had to come back and say, "You know what? It turns out we did need it after all."
And part of the reason is because they have been trying to keep the costs down of this war and have not fully factored in the sacred obligation that I think we have to make sure that every single veteran has the services that they need.
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>>6568845
Speaking of space wizard cowboys, how goes your new comic/format thing? Really enjoy your comic and am looking forward to more.
>>
OBAMA: Of course, part of that has to do with the fact that, with the Medicare prescription drug , for example, the Congress specifically exempted Medicare from being able to negotiate for the cheapest available price. And that was a profound mistake.
But just to make sure that you're clear, we have to a V.A. that serves everybody. And in some rural communities that don't have access to services that are -- the veterans don't have access to the services that are needed, we've got to make sure that they do have the option for a private hospital that is more -- that is closer by.
BLITZER: So what you're saying is they should be allowed -- veterans -- not just to have to go to Veteran's Affairs hospitals but to go to regular hospitals as well?
OBAMA: I think they should be able to go to -- they should be going to V.A. hospitals unless they have difficulty accessing...
BLITZER: All right.
OBAMA: ... and it places a hardship on the family. Then they should be exempt and be able to go to other hospitals.
BLITZER: Governor?
RICHARDSON: Well, I disagree. Under my health care plan, if you have served this country -- enlisted, a veteran -- I would give you under my health care plan, your husband, a hero's health card so that your husband could get health care anywhere they want, with any doctor, with any hospital.
(APPLAUSE)
Our system right now, our V.A. system, is good, but we have to offer our veterans that choice. Some have to go 150 miles, especially in rural areas.
I would also do something else in terms of veterans health care. What we have in our V.A. system is cost-of-living increases for other benefits, but not for V.A. health care. And today a lot of our vets coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan, PTSD, mental health. We cannot do enough to help them. And it's critically important that we have a well-funded V.A. sy
BLITZER: T eds from the V.A., so I know the situation quite well.
>>
BLITZER: All right.
DODD: But to do that, to do that you've also got to make sure that we're going to be prepared to use that force not as the first arrow we draw out of the quiver, but rather utilizing the other resources we have as a nation to advance our interests. That has not happened here under this administration. We need to get back to that as a nation.
BLITZER: But is there a specific military program...
DODD: Absolutely. Clearly, we've got systems here -- the F-22 we're looking at, for instance, other things that ought to be reassessed in terms of whether or not they fit into a 21st-century military needs of our nation.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Jennifer, back to you.
VAUGHN: OK, Wolf. Thank you very much.
Carol Kilminster (ph) is with us tonight.
Carol, you live in Merrimack, New Hampshire. You're a social worker. Your son is serving in Iraq.
QUESTION: That's correct.
VAUGHN: Can you tell us his name?
QUESTION: James.
VAUGHN: What is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: Why is it that veterans cannot receive medical services at the hospital of their choice?
VAUGHN: Senator Obama, let's have you answer this question. You serve on the Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs.
OBAMA: Well, first of all, obviously, we thank James for his service.
And I know that here in New Hampshire, as I've been traveling around, there are some deficiencies in the V.A. We don't have a full service V.A. system here so a lot of troops that have been injured are having to travel elsewhere. And that's something that I think we have to address.
There are important efficiencies that we can obtain by having a V.A. hospital system -- for example, prescription drugs.
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>>6567772
If consent is given then it's not a felony. That woman has created a paradox that would be impossible to solve in court. It's not rape if she gave consent, but she only consented to being raped, therefore the sex was not consensual, but non-consensual sex is rape, and she gave her consent to be raped, but...
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KUCINICH: We need to encourage people to be serving in our country's military, but we've got to end the United States' commitment to war as an instrument of diplomacy.
BLITZER: All right. I'm going to bring everybody in.
But, Senator Obama, you want to increase the size of the U.S. military by almost 100,000 troops. That's going to cost ions and ions of dollars.
What do you say to Congressman Kucinich, who says he wants to cut the size of the U.S. military?
OBAMA: Well, keep in mind that there's a difference between the Pentagon budget and the size of the military. So it may be that, for example, there are weapons systems that Dennis and I would agree are outmoded relics of the Cold War.
But what I want to make certain of is that our troops are not going on these repeated tours, lengthy tours, that we are providing them with all the support they need when they are on the ground, and we can't do that currently.
We also need -- and I want to make sure that this is emphasized -- that, when they come home, we are treating them with the dignity and honor that they deserve.
OBAMA: And that's something whether you were for the war or against the war, we can all agree to. And this administration has not done that because they tried to do it on the cheap.
Folks who have post-traumatic stress disorder, folks who have disability payments that are due are not getting the kinds of services they deserve. I have some specific plans to address that.
BLITZER: Senator Dodd, are there relics of the Cold War, big- ticket military items that you would cut?
DODD: Well, first of all, thank you for your service as well.
And, by the way, whatever other disagreements there are about policy, all of us here on this dais applaud immensely the work being done by our men and women in uniform. I think a round of applause for...
(APPLAUSE)
DODD: And th
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So I made Gideon in scribblenauts... Maybe next time I'll make Judy and make them fall in love... is that possible here...
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automobiles get and mandate it.
BLITZER: All right. I want everybody to stand by, because we're only getting started. We're going to continue all of this, but we're ready to shift into part two of tonight's debate, where voters from New Hampshire here will start asking specific questions. We have some work to do on the stage while we move in some of the chairs, move out the podiums.
While we watch that unfolding, you will see it, viewers of WMUR are going to go back to their studios. The rest of you are going to go and see our colleague, Anderson Cooper, and the best political team on television, who are going to give us a sense of this debate so far.
Our debate will resume here in about three minutes. We'll be right back.
(COMMERCIAL BREAK)
VAUGHN: Jenny, what is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: What is your vision on ending major military operations and how do you plan on rebuilding the military after such many years of conflict?
BLITZER: All right. Let me throw that question to Congressman Kucinich, because he's been outspoken on a lot of these issues.
KUCINICH: Thank you very much, Wolf.
First of all, thank you and your family for serving.
This country has to end its occupation of Iraq. And as I mentioned earlier, the Congress, the Democratic Congress has a very serious responsibility in this regard. We should simply not provide any at all. It's one thing to say you don't have the votes. It's another thing not to even offer a and tell the president he has the money now that's in the pipeline to bring the troops home.
KUCINICH: Now, with respect to this war, this war has degraded our service ability, and we need to have certainly a strong army, but I believe that peace is the way we reflect our strength. So I want to see an American military that will be a strong peacekeeping force, not one that is being misused, like the one in ty and who wants to on the troops per se. This $
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RICHARDSON: Well, I was energy secretary and my state -- we call it the Clean Energy state. We have incentives for solar, wind, biomass, biofuels. We require renewable technologies, 20 percent of our electricity.
Here's my answer: What would help in the short term, give us -- the states -- the authority to engage in serious price-gouging investigation.
RICHARDSON: That doesn't happen. But this is not the answer. The answer...
BLITZER: Do you believe they are?
RICHARDSON: No, they're not.
The answer is this. We need an Apollo program, Apollo, led by a president, asking every American to sacrifice, to conserve, that would reduce our dependence on foreign oil, which is 65 percent imported, to 10.
I have the most aggressive plan, according to the League of Conservation Voters.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: It would go to 80 percent, 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.
BLITZER: Thank you...
RICHARDSON: ... by the year 2040. But it takes...
BLITZER: Hold on, Governor.
RICHARDSON: ... an effort by every American.
BLITZER: I'm going to let Senator Biden weigh in as well.
What would you do specifically, Senator Biden -- give it to us briefly -- to reduce, if you want to reduce, the price of gasoline in the United States?
BIDEN: Take away the subsidy which I've introduced legislation to do. It's about $6 ion, $2.7 directly to the oil companies, number one.
Number two, investigate, as president of the United States; use the Justice Department to go in an investigate this whole issue of price-gouging.
Number three, we have to do what we all said here, but, first and foremost, significantly raise the mileage automobiles get and mandate it.
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>>6568921
No Travis? Tsk tsk Anon.
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>>6567772
>>6567498

So do you guys discussing this have a rape thing because we have a few characters for that...
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allow us to develop alternative technologies.
But the real way to get away from this here, our dependency on that kind of fuel is causing us serious problems across the board. So it isn't just a price of fuel issue here, it's also depending upon polluting technologies that are going to cost us so much.
BLITZER: Senator Gravel?
GRAVEL: Well, I join him on the carbon tax. And, of course, that will raise the price of gasoline; let's be candid about that. There's nothing I would do as president to lower the price of gasoline right now.
GRAVEL: We Americans have to grow up. If we want to get off of the dependency on the Middle East we have to own up to the problem. These things cost money. They're controlling our society.
And the sooner we stop fighting these wars -- here, stop and think: You only see $3. Just watch those wheels turn. There's another $4 -- which is what we spend to keep American troops around the world to keep the price.
So you're paying more than $7 a gallon, you just don't know it.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards?
EDWARDS: The first thing we got to do is find out what's happening with these oil and gas companies. Because we know they're making record amounts of money. We know that the same people that are refining the oil are selling it at the gas pump. So there's a huge vertical integration in this operation.
I think there ought to be an investigation of the oil and gas companies by the Justice Department. I think if the laws that presently exist don't deal with this problem and price manipulation, there should be some change in the anti-trust laws.
EDWARDS: I think we need states to enforce clean air laws against these refineries.
And then I guess last but not least in the short term -- Chris is exactly right about the things we need to be doing in the long term. But in the short term, can America finally stop spending $3 ion a year of taxpayers' money subsid
Are the require renewable
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>>6568930
I dunno if you can do ferrets
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I also think this issue provides incredible opportunities for us to grapple with and deal with here, if we have the kind of strong leadership in the country. I believe we can make a difference here on reducing our dependency on those sources of energy while simultaneously rolling back the problems of global warning -- of global warming.
Today we have the solar -- polar caps melting, we have greenhouse gases that are accumulating at record levels way beyond expectations.
We really have the dual responsibility here of reducing the polluting effects of depending upon fossil fuels and also allowing us to develop the alternative technologies that would allow us to move beyond this issue.
DODD: I've introduced a plan here that would require a by the year 2017 50 miles per gallon standard for our automobiles. I believe that can be done. We ought to do it immediately, in my view.
And a carbon tax, in my view, so that you make the polluting dependencies, the polluting fuels, more expensive and encourage them through the use of revenues collected, to move aggressively on developing the alternative technologies of solar and wind and other sources of energy we could use.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator, but the question is: What would you do right now to reduce the price of gasoline?
DODD: Well, what we've offered already, in fact, and that is, of course, we ought to be saying here that when the price of a barrel of oil gets beyond $40 a barrel, where there's plenty of profit here, that those dollars ought to be returned to the consumers in a rebate or plowed back into the research that would allow us to develop alternative technologies.
But the real way to get away from this here, >>6568886
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genocide in Darfur, and I think that President 's vision of our interdependence globally is something, and obviously Senator may have something to say about how I use , so in fairness she should be able to respond.
BLITZER: Let her tell us -- if you were president, Senator , what would your husband do?
: This is a fascinating question.
: They asked the Republicans, they asked the Democrats. And I think from -- respective (ph) of what you've already heard, I believe in using former presidents.
I think we should have everybody helping us to repair the damage of the last, by then, eight years. And when I...
(APPLAUSE)
: ... when I become president, , my dear husband, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
: ... where we don't need friends and allies.
BLITZER: Thank you.
: And he would be a tremendous help in our country's effort to redo that again.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Let's go back to Scott for another question.
SPRADLING: Thanks, Wolf.
Senator Dodd, gas prices are at record high levels. Granite Staters are frustrated. Americans are frustrated. What would you do to reduce gas prices?
DODD: Well, this is a major crisis issue, obviously. Energy, related problems, obviously, problems with global warming, the dependency on the Middle East for so much of our energy supplies.
DODD: It's a national security issue. It's a health care issue.
The problems are profound here and require some very strong answers.
I also think this issue provides incredible opportunities for us to grapple with and deal with here, if we have the kind of strong leader
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>>6568906
I can't know until I finish, sadly.
I think it'd go a lot smoother if I wasn't running into personal roadblocks. I can't say I have 100% faith in the format since I haven't tried it, but I have decent hopes for it.

On that note I genuinely feel bad for not having the next part finished. I was hoping to have it out by now. I know I'm not held to a schedule or any real obligation to continue (save for a sincere desire to do so and provide of course), but that sort of makes me feel worse about it.
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>>6568954
Everything going okay with you? Heard you've been sleeping better: is the melatonin working?
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GRAVEL: That's what can we do.
But under supervision, I think he'll do OK.
(APPLAUSE)
(LAUGHTER)
BLITZER: Governor Richardson, if you were president of the United States, the question is, what would you do with former President ?
(LAUGHTER)
RICHARDSON: Well, the ideal job for President would be secretary general of the United States. But that's probably not doable.
What I would do is -- President gave me, although I don't think he's very happy with me now -- President gave me two great jobs. He gave me ambassador to the United Nations, secretary of energy.
RICHARDSON: I believe he is needed in the Middle East. This administration has not had a Middle East peace envoy as other bipartisan administrations have had.
We have serious problems in the Middle East. Our great ally Israel, which I think needs buttressing, right now is less safe than it was when President Bush came in.
We need a constant Middle East peace process. President gave me two good jobs. I want to pay him back and make a Middle East peace envoy.
BLITZER: What about you, Senator Obama?
Arguably, might be the most popular Democrat out there among Democrats. If you were elected president, what would you have him do?
OBAMA: Well, I think both answers reflect one of the former president's enormous strengths. And that was his capacity to build alliances and relationships around the world. And I have no doubt that played an enormous role in helping that happen.
But what we've seen over the last six years is the effort to replace bluster and belligerence and saber-rattling for solid diplomacy and strategy and foresight.
OBAMA: One of the things that we're going to have to do is to return to that recognition that we can't simply lead with our military. The strength of our military has to be matched with the power of our diplomacy, the strength of our alliances.
That's are going to deal with the crisis in the Middle East. That's how we're going to end a g>>6568886
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air the damage of the last, by then, eight years. And when I...
(APPLAUSE)
: ... when I become president, , my dear husband, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
: ... where we don't need friends and allies.
BLITZER: Th enator.
Let's go back to Sot a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.nd, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
: ... where we don't need friends and allies.
BLITZER: Th enator.
Let's go back to Sot a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.nd, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
>>
>>6568379
Nick's been pumped full of venom.
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respond.
BLITZER: Let her tell us -- if you were president, Senator , what would your husband do?
: This is a fascinating question.
: They asked the Republicans, they asked the Democrats. And I think from -- respective (ph) of what you've already heard, I believe in using former presidents.
I think we should have everybody helping us to repair the damage of the last, by then, eight years. And when I...
(APPLAUSE)
: ... when I become president, , my dear husband, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
: ... where we don't need friends and allies.
BLITZER: Thank you.
: And he would be a tremendous help in our country's effort to redo that again.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Let's go back to Scott for another question.
mer presidents.
I think we should have everybody helping us to repair the damage of the last, by then, eight years. And when I...
(APPLAUSE)
: ... when I become president, , my dear husband, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the world.
There's not a problem we face, from global terrorism to global warming or HIV/AIDS or bird flu or tuberculosis...
BLITZER: All right.
: ... where we don't need friends and allies.
BLITZER: Th enator.
Let's go back to Scott for another question.
>>
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Senator Dodd, gas prices are at record high levels. Granite Staters are frustrated. Americans are frustrated. What would you do to reduce gas prices?
DODD: Well, this is a major crisis issue, obviously. Energy, related problems, obviously, problems with global warming, the dependency on the Middle East for so much of our energy supplies.
DODD: It's a national security issue. It's a health care issue.
The problems are profound here and require some very strong answers.
I also think this issue provides incredible opportunities for us to grapple with and deal with here, if we have the kind of strong leadership in the country. I believe we can make a difference here on reducing our dependency on those sources of energy while simultaneously rolling back the problems of global warning -- of global warming.
Today we have the solar -- polar caps melting, we have greenhouse gases that are accumulating at record levels way beyond expectations.
We really have the dual responsibility here of reducing the polluting effects of depending upon fossil fuels and also allowing us to develop the alternative technologies that would allow us to move beyond this issue.
DODD: I've introduced a plan here that would require a by the year 2017 50 miles per gallon standard for our automobiles. I believe that can be done. We ought to do it immediately, in my view.
And a carbon tax, in my view, so that you make the polluting dependencies, the polluting fuels, more expensive and encourage them through the use of revenues collected, to move aggressively on developing the alternative technologies of solar and wind and other sources of energy we could use.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator, but the question is: What would you do right now to reduce the price of gasoline?
DODD: Well, what we've offered already, in fact, and t oing to the problem. These things cost money. They're controlling our soci
>>
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think there ought to be an investigation of the oil and gas companies by the Justice Department. I think if the laws that presently exist don't deal with this problem and price manipulation, there should be some change in the anti-trust laws.
EDWARDS: I think we need states to enforce clean air laws against these refineries.
And then I guess last but not least in the short term -- Chris is exactly right about the things we need to be doing in the long term. But in the short term, can America finally stop spending $3 ion a year of taxpayers' money subsidizing oil and gas companies that already make ions of dollars? That's what we ought to be doing.
BLITZER: Governor Richardson, you're a former secretary of energy.
Are the oil companies -- the big oil companies engaged in price- gouging of the American consumer?
RICHARDSON: Well, I was energy secretary and my state -- we call it the Clean Energy state. We have incentives for solar, wind, biomass, biofuels. We require renewable technologies, 20 percent of our electricity.
Here's my answer: What would help in the short term, give us -- the states -- the authority to engage in serious price-gouging investigation.
RICHARDSON: That doesn't happen. But this is not the answer. The answer...
BLITZER: Do you believe they are?
RICHARDSON: No, they're not.
The answer is this. We need an Apollo program, Apollo, led by a president, asking every American to sacrifice, to conserve, that would reduce our dependence on foreign oil, which is 65 percent imported, to 10.
I have the most aggressive plan, according to the League of Conservation Voters.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: It would go to 80 percent, 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.
BLITZER: Thank you...
RICHARDSON: ... by the year 2040. But it takes...
BLITZER: Hold on, Governor.
RICHARDSON: ... an effort by every American.
>>
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>>6568962
I haven't actually tried the melatonin, but I have been sleeping better for the most part. Despite that I should probably start taking it all the same. Never know when that'll happen again.

No for the most part I'm fine. Just my usual troubles nowadays. I.E. ones I cause myself.

Sleep problems aside this past month was much better than the one prior.
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the oil companies, number one.
Number two, investigate, as president of the United States; use the Justice Department to go in an investigate this whole issue of price-gouging.
Number three, we have to do what we all said here, but, first and foremost, significantly raise the mileage automobiles get and mandate it.
BLITZER: All right. I want everybody to stand by, because we're only getting started. We're going to continue all of this, but we're ready to shift into part two of tonight's debate, where voters from New Hampshire here will start asking specific questions. We have some work to do on the stage while we move in some of the chairs, move out the podiums.
While we watch that unfolding, you will see it, viewers of WMUR are going to go back to their studios. The rest of you are going to go and see our colleague, Anderson Cooper, and the best political team on television, who are going to give us a sense of this debate so far.
Our debate will resume here in about three minutes. We'll be right back.
(COMMERCIAL BREAK)
VAUGHN: Jenny, what is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: What is your vision on ending major military operations and how do you plan on rebuilding the military after such many years of conflict?
BLITZER: All right. Let me throw that question to Congressman Kucinich, because he's been outspoken on a lot of these issues.
KUCINICH: Thank you very much, Wolf.
First of all, thank you and your family for serving.
This country has to end its occupation of Iraq. And as I mentioned earlier, the Congress, the Democratic Congress has a very serious resp
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>>6568954
Don't feel bad about not having it done promptly and professionally, this isn't your job and personal shit takes precedence. I am just happy you spare any time at all to help this community stay full of cuties.

>>6568970
It looks good on him.
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Congress has a very serious responsibility in this regard. We should simply not provide any at all. It's one thing to say you don't have the votes. It's another thing not to even offer a and tell the president he has the money now that's in the pipeline to bring the troops home.
KUCINICH: Now, with respect to this war, this war has degraded our service ability, and we need to have certainly a strong army, but I believe that peace is the way we reflect our strength. So I want to see an American military that will be a strong peacekeeping force, not one that is being misused, like the one in this administration -- misuses our military.
And we need a commander in chief who wants to link peace with security and who wants to see America's role working with the world community in cooperation.
BLITZER: But her question was: Specifically, what would you do to rebuild the military, which seems to be pretty stretched right now? What -- do you have a plan?
KUCINICH: Well, the first thing we need to do is cut -- first of all, there's a couple different dimension to this. One is, we need to cut military spending over all by about 25 percent. There's a lot of waste here we're talking about.
Money hasn't been focused on the troops per se. This $97 ion that went for this war isn't going to the troops. A small fraction goes to the troops.
So we need to have a strong military.
KUCINICH: We need to encourage people to be serving in our country's military, but we've got to end the United States' commitment to war as an instrument of diplomacy.
BLITZER: All right. I'm going to bring everybody in.
But, Senator Obama, you want to increase the size of the U.S. military by almost 100,000 troops. That's going to cost ions and ions of dollars.
What do you say to Congressman Kucinich, who says he wants to cut the size of the U.S. military?
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What do you say to Congressman Kucinich, who says he wants to cut the size of the U.S. military?
OBAMA: Well, keep in mind that there's a difference between the Pentagon budget and the size of the military. So it may be that, for example, there are weapons systems that Dennis and I would agree are outmoded relics of the Cold War.
But what I want to make certain of is that our troops are not going on these repeated tours, lengthy tours, that we are providing them with all the support they need when they are on the ground, and we can't do that currently.
We also need -- and I want to make sure that this is emphasized -- that, when they come home, we are treating them with the dignity and honor that they deserve.
OBAMA: And that's something whether you were for the war or against the war, we can all agree to. And this administration has not done that because they tried to do it on the cheap.
Folks who have post-traumatic stress disorder, folks who have disability payments that are due are not getting the kinds of services they deserve. I have some specific plans to address that.
BLITZER: Senator Dodd, are there relics of the Cold War, big- ticket military items that you would cut?
DODD: Well, first of all, thank you for your service as well.
And, by the way, whatever other disagreements there are about policy, all of us here on this dais applaud immensely the work being done by our men and women in uniform. I think a round of applause for...
(APPLAUSE)
DODD: And that's the right issue, I think. We're not listening to our senior military people, by the way, who tried to engage in a transformation of our military needs here, recognizing that there are different threats we face today than we did during the Cold War.
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DODD: And clearly, there needs to be a reassessment of what those priorities are, what those systems are so that we're strong enough.
We all need to say this, by the way. I think it's very, very important. No one's going to be elected president, ought to be president that's not going to have as their primary priority keeping us safe and secure. That is the principal responsibility of an American president.
BLITZER: All right.
DODD: But to do that, to do that you've also got to make sure that we're going to be prepared to use that force not as the first arrow we draw out of the quiver, but rather utilizing the other resources we have as a nation to advance our interests. That has not happened here under this administration. We need to get back to that as a nation.
BLITZER: But is there a specific military program...
DODD: Absolutely. Clearly, we've got systems here -- the F-22 we're looking at, for instance, other things that ought to be reassessed in terms of whether or not they fit into a 21st-century military needs of our nation.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Jennifer, back to you.
VAUGHN: OK, Wolf. Thank you very much.
Carol Kilminster (ph) is with us tonight.
Carol, you live in Merrimack, New Hampshire. You're a social worker. Your son is serving in Iraq.
QUESTION: That's correct.
VAUGHN: Can you tell us his name?
QUESTION: James.
VAUGHN: What is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: Why is it that veterans cannot receive medical services at the hospital of their choice?
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back to that as a nation.
BLITZER: But is there a specific military program...
DODD: Absolutely. Clearly, we've got systems here -- the F-22 we're looking at, for instance, other things that ought to be reassessed in terms of whether or not they fit into a 21st-century military needs of our nation.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Jennifer, back to you.
VAUGHN: OK, Wolf. Thank you very much.
Carol Kilminster (ph) is with us tonight.
Carol, you live in Merrimack, New Hampshire. You're a social worker. Your son is serving in Iraq.
QUESTION: That's correct.
VAUGHN: Can you tell us his name?
QUESTION: James.
VAUGHN: What is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: Why is it that veterans cannot receive medical services at the hospital of their choice?
VAUGHN: Senator Obama, let's have you answer this question. You serve on the Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs.
OBAMA: Well, first of all, obviously, we thank James for his service.
And I know that here in New Hampshire, as I've been traveling around, there are some deficiencies in the V.A. We don't have a full service V.A. system here so a lot of troops that have been injured are having to travel elsewhere. And that's something that I think we have to address.
There are important efficiencies that we can obtain by having a V.A. hospital her or not they fit into a 21st-century military needs of our nation.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator.
Jennifer, back to you.
VAUGHN: OK, Wolf. Thank you very much.
Carol Kilminster (ph) is with us tonight.
Carol, you live in Merrimack, New Hampshire. You're a social worker. Your son is serving in Iraq.
QUESTION: That's correct.
VAUGHN: Can you tell us his name?
QUESTION: James.
VAUGHN: What is your question for the can cies that we can obtain by having a V.A. hospital system -- for example, prescription drugs.
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>>6568988
At the very least, I'm happy you're doing better with sleep, Inky.
Hope your other problems melt away, too.
>>
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This country has to end its occupation of Iraq. And as I mentioned earlier, the Congress, the Democratic Congress has a very serious responsibility in this regard. We should simply not provide any at all. It's one thing to say you don't have the votes. It's another thing not to even offer a and tell the president he has the money now that's in the pipeline to bring the troops home.
KUCINICH: Now, with respect to this war, this war has degraded our service ability, and we need to have certainly a strong army, but I believe that peace is the way we reflect our strength. So I want to see an American military that will be a strong peacekeeping force, not one that is being misused, like the one in this administration -- misuses our military.
And we need a commander in chief who wants to link peace with security and who wants to see America's role working with the world community in cooperation.
BLITZER: But her question was: Specifically, what would you do to rebuild the military, which seems to be pretty stretched right now? What -- do you have a plan?
KUCINICH: Well, the first thing we need to do is cut -- first of all, there's a couple different dimension to this. One is, we need to cut military spending over all by about 25 percent. There's a lot of waste here we're talking about.
Money hasn't been focused on the troops per se. This $97 ion that went for this war isn't going to the troops. A small fraction goes to the troops.
So we need to have a strong military.
KUCINICH: We need to encourage people to be serving in our country's military, but we've got to end the United States' commitment to war as an instrument of diplomacy.
BLITZER: All right. I'm going to bring everybody in.
But, Senator Obama, you want to increase the size of the U.S. military by almost 100,000 troops. That's going to cost ions and ions of dollars.
What do you s ennis and I would agree are outmoded relics of the Cold
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>>6568990
This made me happy to hear.

I'll still do the best I can to come out with something new. Hopefully soon.

Hopefully.

>>6569015
I appreciate it, but I think they'd melt away faster if I stopped causing them for myself.

Either way the sentiment is sincerely appreciated. Thank you.
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We've talked about the price gouging that takes place in other systems, in the private health care system. The V.A. actually has done a very good job at negotiating prescription drug prices so that they're lower for V.A. veterans who are going through their system than they are if they were going through another hospital system.
OBAMA: Of course, part of that has to do with the fact that, with the Medicare prescription drug , for example, the Congress specifically exempted Medicare from being able to negotiate for the cheapest available price. And that was a profound mistake.
But just to make sure that you're clear, we have to a V.A. that serves everybody. And in some rural communities that don't have access to services that are -- the veterans don't have access to the services that are needed, we've got to make sure that they do have the option for a private hospital that is more -- that is closer by.
BLITZER: So what you're saying is they should be allowed -- veterans -- not just to have to go to Veteran's Affairs hospitals but to go to regular hospitals as well?
OBAMA: I think they should be able to go to -- they should be going to V.A. hospitals unless they have difficulty accessing...
BLITZER: All right.
OBAMA: ... and it places a hardship on the family. Then they should be exempt and be able to go to other hospitals.
BLITZER: Governor?
RICHARDSON: Well, I disagree. Under my health care plan, if you have served this country -- enlisted, a veteran -- I would give you under my health care plan, your husband, a hero's health card so that your husband could get health care anywhere they want, with any doctor, with any hospital.
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Our lp them. And it's critically
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We also need -- and I want to make sure that this is emphasized -- that, when they come home, we are treating them with the dignity and honor that they deserve.
OBAMA: And that's something whether you were for the war or against the war, we can all agree to. And this administration has not done that because they tried to do it on the cheap.
Folks who have post-traumatic stress disorder, folks who have disability payments that are due are not getting the kinds of services they deserve. I have some specific plans to address that.
BLITZER: Senator Dodd, are there relics of the Cold War, big- ticket military items that you would cut?
DODD: Well, first of all, thank you for your service as well.
And, by the way, whatever other disagreements there are about policy, all of us here on this dais applaud immensely the work being done by our men and women in uniform. I think a round of applause for...
(APPLAUSE)
DODD: And that's the right issue, I think. We're not listening to our senior military people, by the way, who tried to engage in a transformation of our military needs here, recognizing that there are different threats we face today than we did during the Cold War.
DODD: And clearly, there needs to be a reassessment of what those priorities are, what those systems are so that we're strong enough.
We all need to say this, by the way. I think it's very, very important. No one's going to be elected president, ought to be president that's not going to have as their primary priority keeping us safe and secure. That is the principal responsibility of an American president.
BLITZER: All right.
DODD: But to do that, to do that you've also got to make sure that we're going to be prepared to use that force not as the first arrow we draw out of the quiver, but rather utilizing the other resources we have as a nation to advance our interests. That has not happened here under this administration. We need to get back to that as a nation.
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I have the most aggressive plan, according to the League of Conservation Voters.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: It would go to 80 percent, 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.
BLITZER: Thank you...
RICHARDSON: ... by the year 2040. But it takes...
BLITZER: Hold on, Governor.
RICHARDSON: ... an effort by every American.
BLITZER: I'm going to let Senator Biden weigh in as well.
What would you do specifically, Senator Biden -- give it to us briefly -- to reduce, if you want to reduce, the price of gasoline in the United States?
BIDEN: Take away the subsidy which I've introduced legislation to do. It's about $6 ion, $2.7 directly to the oil companies, number one.
Number two, investigate, as president of the United States; use the Justice Department to go in an investigate this whole issue of price-gouging.
Number three, we have to do what we all said here, but, first and foremost, significantly raise the mileage automobiles get and mandate it.
BLITZER: All right. I want everybody to stand by, because we're only getting started. We're going to continue all of this, but we're ready to shift into part two of tonight's debate, where voters from New Hampshire here will start asking specific going to go and see our colleague, Anderson Cooper, and the best political team on television, who are going to give us a sense of this debate so far.
Our debate will resume here in about three minutes. We'll be right back.
(COMMERCIAL BREAK)
VAUGHN: Jenny, what is your question for the candidates tonight?
QUESTION: My question is: What is your vision on ending major ?
BLITZER: All right. Let me throw that question to Congressman Kucinich, because he's been outspoken on a lot of these issues.
KUCINICH: Thank you very much, Wolf.
First of all, thank you and your family for serving.
This country has to end its occupation of Iraq. And as I mentioned earlier, the Congress, the Democratic Congress has a very serious responsibility in this regard. We should
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>>6569025
Would snuggle that teddy bear.
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have to own up to the problem. These things cost money. They're controlling our society.
And the sooner we stop fighting these wars -- here, stop and think: You only see $3. Just watch those wheels turn. There's another $4 -- which is what we spend to keep American troops around the world to keep the price.
So you're paying more than $7 a gallon, you just don't know it.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards?
EDWARDS: The first thing we got to do is find out what's happening with these oil and gas companies. Because we know they're making record amounts of money. We know that the same people that are refining the oil are selling it at the gas pump. So there's a huge vertical integration in this operation.
I think there ought to be an investigation of the oil and gas companies by the Justice Department. I think if the laws that presently exist don't deal with this problem and price manipulation, there should be some change in the anti-trust laws.
EDWARDS: I think we need states to enforce clean air laws against these refineries.
And then I guess last but not least in the short term -- Chris is exactly right about the things we need to be doing in the long term. But in the short term, can America finally stop spending $3 ion a year of taxpayers' money subsidizing oil and gas companies that already make ions of dollars? That's what we ought to be doing.
BLITZER: Governor Richardson, you're a former secretary of energy.
Are the oil companies -- the big oil companies engaged in price- gouging of the American consumer?
RICHARDSON: Well, I was energy secretary and my state -- we call it the Clean Energy state. We have incentives for solar, wind, biomass, biofuels. We require renewable technologies, 20 percent of our electricity.
Here's my answer: What would help in the short term, give us -- the states -- the authority to engage in serious price-gouging investigation.
RICHARDSON: That doesn't happen. But this is not the answer. Th
The answe
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Senator Dodd, gas prices are at record high levels. Granite Staters are frustrated. Americans are frustrated. What would you do to reduce gas prices?
DODD: Well, this is a major crisis issue, obviously. Energy, related problems, obviously, problems with global warming, the dependency on the Middle East for so much of our energy supplies.
DODD: It's a national security issue. It's a health care issue.
The problems are profound here and require some very strong answers.
I also think this issue provides incredible opportunities for us to grapple with and deal with here, if we have the kind of strong leadership in the country. I believe we can make a difference here on reducing our dependency on those sources of energy while simultaneously rolling back the problems of global warning -- of global warming.
Today we have the solar -- polar caps melting, we have greenhouse gases that are accumulating at record levels way beyond expectations.
We really have the dual responsibility here of reducing the polluting effects of depending upon fossil fuels and also allowing us to develop the alternative technologies that would allow us to move beyond this issue.
DODD: I've introduced a plan here that would require a by the year 2017 50 miles per gallon standard for our automobiles. I believe that can be done. We ought to do it immediately, in my view.
And a carbon tax, in my view, so that you make the polluting dependencies, the polluting fuels, more expensive and encourage them through the use of revenues collected, to move aggressively on developing the alternative technologies of solar and wind and other sources of energy we could use.
BLITZER: Thank you, Senator, but the question is: What would you do right now to reduce the price of gasoline?
DODD: Well, what we've offered already, in fact, and that is, of course, we ought to be saying here that when the price of a barrel of oil gets beyond $40 a barrel, where there's plenty of profit h Just watch those
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Arguably, might be the most popular Democrat out there among Democrats. If you were elected president, what would you have him do?
OBAMA: Well, I think both answers reflect one of the former president's enormous strengths. And that was his capacity to build alliances and relationships around the world. And I have no doubt that played an enormous role in helping that happen.
But what we've seen over the last six years is the effort to replace bluster and belligerence and saber-rattling for solid diplomacy and strategy and foresight.
OBAMA: One of the things that we're going to have to do is to return to that recognition that we can't simply lead with our military. The strength of our military has to be matched with the power of our diplomacy, the strength of our alliances.
That's how we are going to deal with the crisis in the Middle East. That's how we're going to end a genocide in Darfur, and I think that President 's vision of our interdependence globally is something, and obviously Senator may have something to say about how I use , so in fairness she should be able to respond.
BLITZER: Let her tell us -- if you were president, Senator , what would your husband do?
: This is a fascinating question.
: They asked the Republicans, they asked the Democrats. And I think from -- respective (ph) of what you've already heard, I believe in using former presidents.
I think we should have everybody helping us to repair the damage of the last, by then, eight years. And when I...
(APPLAUSE)
: ... when I become president, , my dear husband, will be one of the people who will be sent around the world as a roving ambassador to make it very clear to the rest of the world that we're back to a policy of reaching out and working and trying to make friends and allies and stopping the alienation of the rest of the endous help in our country's effo olf.
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ITZER: All right...
EDWARDS: ... who's most likely to lead on immigration, which is what you just asked about.
BLITZER: All right. We've got to move on to the next question. Let me throw it back to Scott.
SPRADLING: Senator Gravel, if you are elected president, how if at all would you use former president in your administration?
(LAUGHTER)
GRAVEL: How would I use him?
Well, I'd send him as a roving ambassador around the world. He'd be good. He could take his wife with him, who will still be in the Senate.
(LAUGHTER)
... and -- but, you know -- but I'd be careful with the president, former president, because I know he wimped out with respect to gays in the military.
I'd only wished that he had been like Harry Truman who stood up to Omar Bradley when he integrated the services, which made possible for Colin Powell to now stare down the president of the United States when the president should have demanded immediate integration.
GRAVEL: That's what can we do.
But under supervision, I think he'll do OK.
(APPLAUSE)
(LAUGHTER)
BLITZER: Governor Richardson, if you were president of the United States, the question is, what would you do with former President ?
(LAUGHTER)
RICHARDSON: Well, the ideal job for President would be secretary general of the United States. But that's probably not doable.
What I would do is -- President gave me, although I don't think he's very happy with me now -- President gave me two great jobs. He gave me ambassador to the United Nations, secretary of energy.
RICHARDSON: I believe he is needed in the Middle East. This administration has not had a Middle East peace envoy as other bipartisan administrations have had.
We have serious problems in the Middle East. Our great ally Israel, which I think needs buttressing, right now is less safe than it was when President Bush came in.
We need a constant Middle East peace process. Pres
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BLITZER: All of you agree on this.
Governor Richardson, go ahead.
RICHARDSON: I love all this parsing and senatorial courtesy and "on the one hand, on the other hand."
Here's what I would do. I would do what I did as governor of New Mexico. One, I would move in the Congress for a hate crimes law. I would have domestic partnerships. I would have civil unions. I would initiate laws that practice nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.
I would get rid of "don't ask/don't tell." I voted against it as a congressman.
A president has to show leadership. And this country should not be asking a person who is giving up their life for this country and the military should not...
BLITZER: Thank you, Governor.
RICHARDSON: ... should not giving lecture on sexual orientation.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards, I want you to weigh in on a related question. The governor of New Hampshire is here with us tonight. He just signed legislation into law in this state allowing civil unions.
BLITZER: There are...
(APPLAUSE)
All right. Let's try to keep the applause down.
The question is this: Is it time to move beyond that and let gays and lesbians get married?
EDWARDS: Well, first of all, I think what the governor did and what New Hampshire's done is a great example for the rest of the country. Not only civil unions, but all the partnership benefits, including, Senator talked about getting rid of this "don't ask/don't tell" policy.
I don't think the federal government has a role in telling either states or religious institutions, churches, what marriages they can bless and can't bless. I think the state of New Hampshire ought to be able to make that decision for itself, like every other state in the country. I think every church ought to be able to make that decision for itself.
And I think it's very important that we stand up against intolerance and against discrimination.
But I want to add o
BLITZER: All right.
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(APPLAUSE)
: And I believe we should open up our military.
BLITZER: Senator , the question was: Was your husband's decision to allow this "don't ask/don't tell" policy to go forward -- he was president of the United States; he could have changed it -- was it a mistake?
: No, it was an important first step, Wolf. I mean, you know, there's a certain -- I want to go back to my friend Joe Biden...
BLITZER: All right.
: Because he's been around longer than any of us have in the Congress.
(LAUGHTER)
: And you know, talking -- he's a young man. He started young. But talking about this as though there is a reality out there that a president or a Congress can change with a snap of a finger does a grave disservice to the American people.
We have a political process. There are checks and balances. And Joe remembers very well, the Congress was adamantly opposed at the time to letting gays and lesbians serve openly.
: "Don't ask/don't tell" was the compromise policy.
BLITZER: But you know, Senator Biden, there are still a lot of military commanders out there, including the current chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace, who say keep the current policy, "don't ask/don't tell," it would be demoralizing, it would be bad for military readiness to change that policy and let gays and lesbians serve openly in the U.S. military.
BIDEN: Peter Pace is flat wrong. I've been to Afghanistan, I've been to Iraq seven times, I've been in the Balkans, I've been in these foxholes with these kids, literally in bunkers with them.
Let me tell you something: Nobody asked anybody else whether they're gay in those holes, those foxholes, number one.
Number two, our allies, the British, the French, all our major allies, gays openly serve.
ree on this
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>>6569048
>teddy bear
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Wolf, I have written the . It is H.R. 676, with John Conyers, supported by 14,000 physicians.
KUCINICH: And you know what? What Senator , Senator Edwards, Senator Obama are talking about, they're talking about letting the insurance companies stay in charge. They're talking about continuing a for-profit health care system. And I think...
BLITZER: All right, hold on...
(APPLAUSE)
KUCINICH: ... we need a president who is ready to challenge that.
(APPLAUSE)
And I'm ready to challenge the insurance companies.
BLITZER: All right, let's go to the next question.
Tom?
FAHEY: Let's try this now.
(LAUGHTER)
This is my voice.
Senator , you've said that it's time to allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the U.S. military and end the "don't ask/don't tell" policy that was implemented when your husband was president.
Was President 's policy of "don't ask/don't tell" a mistake?
: It was a transition policy and it was an effort to try to deal with the reality that -- probably since the very beginning of our nation we've had gays serving in our military with distinction and honor on behalf of our country, as we do today.
: And yet I have watched how "don't ask/don't tell" has been implemented. And I've concluded that it is not the best way for us as a nation to proceed.
It has been in many instances implemented in a discriminatory manner. You know, after the first Gulf War there was a big flood of discharges of gays and lesbians because they let them serve and then after they finished the war, then they discharged them.
In this particular time period, we've had Arabic linguists discharged under "don't ask/don't tell" when we are unfortunately so short of having people who speak the very language that our men and women in uniform have to understand in the streets of Baghdad.
So I believe we could change the policy to let gays and lesbians serve in the military and be covered by the Uniform Code of Military Justice.
: So just like th ey are.
BLITZER: All right.
: And I j
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>>6569080
I really love them being all snugly together.
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Number one: My plan is mandatory. You do have everybody sharing -- the employer, the employee -- you have the state and the federal government.
Secondly, I believe that we can have a plan where, if you were satisfied with your health care plan, you can keep it. No new bureaucracies. But, in addition to that, you focus on prevention. You allow everybody to get the congressional plan that every member here has.
BLITZER: Thank you.
RICHARDSON: You bring Medicare 55 and over...
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: That's what you do.
BLITZER: Thank you, Governor.
I promised Senator Dodd he could weigh in as well.
DODD: Well, listen, this is a -- there's not a person in this audience or who's watching this program who wouldn't tell you that they've encountered the problems of the health care system in this country.
It is shameful. We rank 42nd in infant mortality in the United States worldwide. We rank 45th in life expectancy.
It is shameful that in the 21st century we have 47 million of our fellow citizens without health care coverage; 9 million children.
DODD: And the number's growing every single day.
Look, as we've said here, there's basic agreement about universality here, dealing with . It's going to take cooperation to get it done. ay -- just 15 seconds on it?
BLITZER: I'll l ch -- I've got a specific question for Congressman K ry quick. I think it is very important, though, to understand -- I think Senator Obama was very honest just now.
We have a threshold question about whether we're going to have truly universal care. The New Republic has estimated that his plan will leave about 15 million people uncovered. He says he will do something about that later.
I believe that unless we have a law requiring that every man, woman and child in America be covered, we're going to have millions of peopl e in Senator Obama's plan.
y, so that rural hospitals e it. The reason is because they can't afford it.
O the country c
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$1,000 a year. And we can also make sure that we provide coverage for everybody else. And we do provide mandatory health care for children.
BLITZER: Senator , you've been involved in this issue -- as all of us remember -- for a long time.
What do you think of Senator Obama's plan?
: Well, I'm thrilled that universal health care is back on the national agenda. You know, as we remember, back in '93 and '94 we tried to come forward with a plan. We weren't successful. I have the scars to show for that experience.
But I am convinced that now when the Democrats all are coming forward saying, "This has to be a national goal," we then can try to get the political will.
The most important thing is not the plan. Because there are only a few ways to do this. And we're all talking pretty much about the same things. From my perspective, we have to lower cost, improve quality and cover everybody.
What's important, and what I learned in the previous effort is you've got to have the political will -- a broad coalition of business and labor, doctors, nurses, hospitals -- everybody standing firm when the inevitable attacks come from the insurance companies and the pharmaceutical companies that don't want to change the system because they make so much money out of it.
BLITZER: Senator , you can do that without raising taxes?
: Well, Wolf, here's the challenge. I have put forth approximately $120 ion in savings from health care changes that can come; everything from electronic medical records to better management of chronic care. That is about in the ballpark of what all of us believe it will cost to cover everyone.
The challenge that I'm wrestling with is: How do we realize the savings? Now, I don't think there's any Democrat that is not going to let the Bush tax cuts on the wealthiest Americans expire. We're all going to do that. So that money will be available.
How
RICHARDS
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(APPLAUSE)
BLITZER: All right. We're going to save our applause until the end, please.
Senator ?
: Wolf, let me add that we faced that in the Senate last year as to whether we would or would not vote for it.
The problem is that if it becomes official instead of recognized as national -- which indeed it is, it is our national language -- if it becomes official, that means in a place like New York City you can't print ballots in any other language. That means you can't have government pay for translators in hospitals so when somebody comes in with some sort of emergency there's nobody there to help translate what their problem is for the doctor.
So many of us -- I did, at least -- voted to say that English was our national language, but not the official language because of the legal consequences of that.
BLITZER: Senator Dodd, you know most of the polls show an overwhelming majority of the American public favors making English the official language of the United States.
DODD: Well, I think the points that were made by Barack Obama and are very, very important here. This is the kind of question that does divide us.
Just a related point here: We need to be encouraging more language training in our country. At the time of the 9/11 attacks here, we had advertisements running in national newspapers for anybody who could speak Arabic, here.
We have too few of our people in our country that can understand second languages. This is the 21st century. This is a global economy. We need to encourage more diversity in that.
BLITZER: All right...
DODD: Certainly, we have a national language here. I speak fluent Spanish, along with Richardson.
BLITZER: All right...
DODD: I'm proud of the fact I speak two languages. But we ought to be encouraging more of that in the country and not talking about how we have one official language in our nation. That's not helping our country.
BLITZER: All righ
SPRADLIN
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SPRADLING: This is a health care question for you, and really focusing on price tags here.
Governor Richardson, for example, says that you can fund health care meaningfully without raising taxes. Senator has said that she's not prepared to say she will raises taxes to reform health care. Your plan does raise some taxes to fund your universal health care program.
So I am wondering: From your perspective, are they being honest about the true costs of universal health care in America?
EDWARDS: Let me say, first, I think it's a very healthy thing that we have Democrats coming out with health care plans. This country's health care system is completely dysfunctional. I am proud of the fact that I was the first person to come out with a specific, truly universal health care plan.
Senator Obama came out with a plan just a few days ago, which I don't believe is completely universal, but he deserves to be credited because he laid out what the cost is, and exactly how he was going to pay for it.
I do believe that -- and by the way, you didn't say this, but my plan costs $90 ion to $120 ion a year.
EDWARDS: I'd pay for it by getting rid of Bush's tax cuts for people who make over $200,000 a year.
And I believe you cannot cover everybody in America, create a more efficient health care system, cover the cracks, you know, getting rid of things like pre-existing conditions and making sure that mental health is treated the same as physical health, I don't think you can do all those thing
GRAVEL: How would I use him?
Well, I'd send him as a roving ambassador around the world. He'd be good. He could take his wife with him, who will still be in the Senate.
(LAUGHTER)
... and -- but, you know -- but I'd be careful with the president, former president, because I know he wimped out with respect to gays in the military.
I'd only wished that he had been like Harry Truman who st r profits.
If
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You also voted for that legislation, including the construction of that fence. And some say, to be even-handed, if you want to build a fence along the border with Mexico, you should also build a fence along the border with Canada.
OBAMA: Well, we should certainly do a better job patrolling the borders in Canada. In fact, this recent case with the young lawyer who had tuberculosis being waved through by a border guard because he said he looked OK is a problem. And we've got to strengthen our border patrols on both sides.
But let's go back to the essential issue here. We are a country of immigrants. We're also a country of laws. And the question is, how do we balance that appropriately?
I am hopeful that we can solve this problem constructively. I think Joe is exactly right, that we want to have a situation in which those who are already here, are playing by the rules, are willing to pay a fine and go through a rigorous process, should have a pathway to legalization. And I think most Americans will support that if they have some sense that the border is also being secured.
What they don't want is a situation in which there is a pathway to legalization and you've got another several hundred thousands of folks coming in every year.
OBAMA: And that, I think...
BLITZER: All right.
OBAMA: ... is a sensible position we should be able to arrive at.
BLITZER: We're going to move on to the next question. But before we do, one related question. And I'm going to periodically ask you to raise your hand if you agree or you -- if you agree with the question. And I want you to raise your hand if you believe English should be the official language of the United States.
The only hand I see is Senator Gravel.
GRAVEL: Yeah. We speak English. That doesn't mean we can't encourage other languages. I speak French and English. People speak Spanish and English. But the official language of the United States of America ure generations of immigr
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ow, I commend the Congress for facing up to having a legalization plan, but I will not support a -- our immigration laws in this country always bring families together. together.
RICHARDSON: This separates families.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: There's also a provision -- this is important -- that involves -- that involves guest workers. They should have labor protections.
BLITZER: All right.
RICHARDSON: We don't want to create a permanent underclass in those workers.
BLITZER: Senator Biden, let me let you weigh in. You voted last year to support this immigration legislation, including the construction of an approximately 700-mile fence along the border between the United States and Mexico.
Governor Richardson doesn't think there needs to be such a fence. Why is he wrong?
BIDEN: Well, he's not wrong. There doesn't need to be a 700- mile fence. But there does need -- look, we ought to start -- we all love this phrase: Start talking truth to power.
Fourteen million illegals: Now, you tell me how many buses, carloads, planes -- they're going to go out and round up all these people, spend hundreds of millions and ions of dollars to do it, with the whole world watching, while we send these folks back.
Rather than get a background check on all of them, take out the criminals, get them back, and provide for a means by which we allowed earned citizenship over the next decade or so.
BIDEN: Folks, being commander in chief requires you to occasionally be practical.
(LAUGHTER)
BLITZER: If you don't think there needs to be a fence, why did you vote for that legislation?
BIDEN: Well, that fence was -- the reason I voted for the fence was that was the only alternative that was there.
And I voted for the fence related to drugs. A fence will stop 20 kilos of cocaine coming through that fence. It will not stop someone climbing over it back Senator Obama.
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FAHEY: Yes, I'm hoping, too.
Governor Richardson, a question on immigration. Despite your doubts about the immigration that's now pending in the U.S. Senate, you support granting legal status to about 12 million people who have entered this country illegally.
Why is this not an amnesty program?
BLITZER: All right. I don't know if all the candidates could hear your microphone, so I'm going to re-read his question to make sure all of you heard it.
The question is directed to Governor Richardson.
Governor Richardson, despite your doubts about the immigration pending in the Senate, you support granting legal status to roughly 12 million people who entered the United States illegally.
Why is this not an amnesty program?
RICHARDSON: I'm a border governor.
RICHARDSON: Two years ago, I declared a border emergency because of the tremendous flow of drugs and illegal workers coming into my state.
I deal with this issue every day.
Here's my position: I would not support legislation that divided families; I would not support legislation that builds a wall, a Berlin-type wall, between two countries the way the in the Congress exists today.
Now, what are the essential components of any good, sensible immigration ?
One, increases border patrols; double the size of border patrols and technology. That makes sense. Don't reduce the National Guard that's there.
Secondly, an earned legalization program -- yes, I support that -- one that is based on learning English, paying back taxes, passing a background check, getting behind those that are trying to get here legally, obeying laws, embracing American values.
RICHARDSON: And then, lastly, finding ways that we penalize employers that knowingly hire illegal workers. That is essential in an immigration .
BLITZER: Let me get back to the question. Almost al k provision. The head-of-household has to go
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I appreciate John's compliment.
When I looked at the issue, what I saw was a weak case on the part of this administration, the sort of fear-mongering that I think, John, you've referred on this stage tonight.
OBAMA: And the critical thing for us moving forward is to recognize that we are not going to be able to continue to throw our troops at a civil war and be able to succeed.
And I just have to go back to what I said earlier. This is an enormous distraction from the battle that does have to be waged in Afghanistan in rooting out Al Qaida. That is something that we have failed to do. We have the opportunity to be successful there. But we have to finish the job.
BLITZER: Senator Gravel, do you think someone who voted to authorize the president to go to war should be president of the United States?
GRAVEL: Not at all, because it's a moral criteria.
And there's information coming out -- Senator Durbin, Mr. Shrum, in his book -- that really points out that these people knew that there was two sets of intelligence going on at the same time. And they made a political decision to vote the way they voted, a political decision that cost -- stop and think. We have killed more Americans than was done on the 11th of September.
BLITZER: When you...
GRAVEL: More Americans died because of their decision. That disqualifies them for president. It doesn't mean they're bad people. It just means that they don't have moral judgment. And that's very important when you become president.
BLITZER: All right.
Senator , you want to respond?
: Well, I have said repeatedly that if I had known then what I know now, I never would have voted to give the president authority.
And in the last debate, I said that, you know, it was a mistake to trust George Bush that he would do what ernational Atomic E .
What was wrong is the way this president misu
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>>6569092
I can't say the concept hasn't grown on me.

I mean the concept in general. The buns are optional. Fun to draw though.
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Filters are neat.
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search for weapons of mass destruction. They gave the Iraqi people a chance for elections and to have a government. It is the Iraqis who have failed to take advantage of that opportunity.
BLITZER: So let me just be precise, because the question was: Do you regret not reading the national intelligence estimate?
: I feel like I was totally briefed. I knew all of the arguments that were being made by everyone from all directions. National intelligence estimates have a consensus position and then they have argumentation as to those people who don't agree with it. I thought the best way to find out who was right in the intelligence community was to send in the inspectors.
If George Bush had allowed the inspectors to finish the job they started, we would have known that Saddam Hussein did not have WMD and we would not have gone and invaded Iraq.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards, you didn't read that national intelligence estimate either. Do you regret that?
EDWARDS: No, actually, I think that I would agree with some of what just said. I think it's true that I was on the Intelligence Committee -- and I don't think Senator was, but I was on the Intelligence Committee. I received direct information from that. I met with former high-level people in the administration who gave me additional information. And I read the summary of the NIE.
I think I had the information I needed. I don't think that was the question.
I think one difference we do have is I think I was wrong. I should never have voted for this war.
And this goes to the issue that Senator Obama raised a few minutes ago. He deserves credit for being against this war from the beginning. He was right. I was wrong.
(APPLAUSE)
And I think it is important for anybody who seeks to be the next president of the United States, given the dishonesty that we've been faced with ove ualifier. I think th time was the head of the Intelligence Committee -- cited that specifically as one of the
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end the war.
Well, they haven't. They have to stop the funding. And I certainly am urging all of my colleagues here, don't give him any more money. The money's in the pipeline right now, enough to bring the troops home. Let's end the war and let's make this a productive evening.
BLITZER: Senator Biden?
BIDEN: Wolf, look, the Republicans and this president have not told us the truth about this war from the beginning. The last thing we Democrats should do is not be telling the truth.
We have 50 votes in the United States Senate. We have less of a majority in the House than any time other than the last eight years.
Ladies and gentlemen, you're going to end this war when you elect a Democratic president. You need 67 votes to end this war.
I love these guys who tell you they're going to stop the war. Let me tell you straight up the truth. The truth of the matter is, the only one that's emboldened the enemy has been George Bush by his policies, not us funding the war.
BIDEN: We're funding the safety of those troops there until we can get 67 votes...
BLITZER: All right. Hold on, hold on. I want to bring Senator in.
Senator , do you regret voting the authorize the president to use force against Saddam Hussein in Iraq without actually reading the national intelligence estimate, the classified document laying out the best U.S. intelligence at that time?
: Wolf, I was thoroughly briefed. I knew all the arguments. I knew all of what the Defense Department, the CIA, the State Department were all saying. And I sought dissenting opinions, as well as talking to people in previous administrations and outside experts.
You know, that was a sincere vote based on my assessment that sending inspectors back into Iraq to determine once and for all whether Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and using coercive diplomacy was not an
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GRAVEL: Totally. Totally. It's just that simple.
Four of these people here will say that it's George Bush's war. It was facilitated by the Democrats.
GRAVEL: They brought the resolution up. One of them authored, co-authored it here, standing here.
And so it's -- sure, it's George Bush's war. But it's the Democrats' war also.
Now that you want to end it, you're concerned about what's going to happen after we withdraw. Remember Vietnam. All the dominoes are going to fall. Southeast Asia's going to go -- is going to go Communist.
Well, how do we know what will happen? I do know this, that the insurgency is successful because the population sustains that insurgency, period.
BLITZER: All right.
Let's go to the next question from Tom.
Go ahead, Tom.
FAHEY: Yes, thank you.
Congressman Kucinich...
: It's hard to hear you.
FAHEY: OK.
I'll yell. I don't think the mike is working.
BLITZER: Go ahead.
FAHEY: The New Hampshire Union Leader asked readers to e-mail questions for the candidates...
KUCINICH: I can't...
BLITZER: I don't know if we're having trouble with his mike.
I'll read you his question.
KUCINICH: Yeah, go ahead.
BLITZER: The Union Leader, the main newspaper here in New Hampshire, asked readers to e-mail their questions.
Here's one from Michael Pelletier (ph), a major in the New Hampshire National Guard: "Can you tell me if the mission we accomplished during our deployment in Iraq was worth our effort and sacrifice, or was it a waste of time and resources?"
KUCINICH: I honor the people who served. We all owe them a debt of gratitude. But those who sent those soldiers were wrong. They should have never been sent there in the first place, Wolf.
This war has been based on lies. And we could have a productive evening here right now if all of my colleagues on this stage or in the Congress would commit to telling the Democratic leadership not even to offer a funding , because that's really the way to end the war, W ar.
Oh, no. T
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This war has caused many casualties, not the least of which are our troops, obviously, but also the foreign policy. Your first question on terror has been directly affected because of this policy in Iraq.
BLITZER: Governor Richardson, I want Governor Richardson to weigh in because I know you have been very concerned about what is happening with the genocide in Darfur.
What if some of the critics, some of the supporters of this war, are right, and a unilateral, quick U.S. withdrawal from Iraq -- and you want troops out by the end of this year -- does lead not only to an increased civil war, but to genocide in Iraq?
BLITZER: What moral responsibility does the United States have to deal with that scenario?
RICHARDSON: I've spent a lot of time in this region. I was U.N. ambassador. Eighty percent of my time was spent on the Iraq issue. I've talked to the leaders there.
And there is a fundamental difference between my position and the position of my good friends here. I believe that it's a civil war. I believe that there is sectarian conflict already. There is enormous turmoil.
Seven Americans died today.
This is what I would do. I would have a resolution under Article I to deauthorize the war, to move forward with a timetable, the end of this calendar year...
BLITZER: But what about genocide? What about the possibility of genocide?
RICHARDSON: ... no residual -- no residual forces.
I think there has to be pointed out a difference in our approach. Obviously, genocide is something in Darfur. You know, I have been involved in that issue.
RICHARDSON: I believe what we need to do there is stop this genocide. Why don't we care about Africa?
BLITZER: What about Iraq, if it were, God forbid, to happen?
RICHARDSON: Well, obviously, I would keep troops in Kuwait, where they are wanted. I would move them to Afghanistan to fight Al Qaida.
But I believe that our troops have become a target. Our troops right now have done a magnificent job.
And so what -- the
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BIDEN: My colleagues joined me when I proposed fast-forwarding the funding for that so we could get 2,500 of them into the field by August. If we had voted no and stopped this, it would have delayed that. Lives are at stake.
And I knew the right political vote, but I tell you what: Some things are worth losing elections over.
BLITZER: Senator Biden, why are you reluctant to say now: They were wrong, and you were right?
BIDEN: Because I don't want to judge them. I mean, these are my friends. We have worked together. We've worked hard to try and end this war. We have people telling everybody: Just stop the war, Congress. We have 50 votes. We're busting our neck every single day. So I respect it.
But look, I cannot -- as long as there is a single troop in Iraq that I know if I take action by funding them, I increase the prospect they will live or not be injured -- I cannot and will not vote no to fund them.
BLITZER: Senator , you voted in favor of every funding for the U.S. troops since the start of the war until now. And some are accusing you and some others of playing politics with the lives of the troops.
What is your response?
: Well, I have the deepest respect for my friend, Senator Biden, and he and I have agreed on much of what we have attempted to do.
Unfortunately, we don't have a president who is willing to change course. And I think it was time to say enough is enough.
I thought the best way to support our troops was to try to send a very strong message that they should begin to come home. That is the best way to support them. And I thought that vote was an opportunity to do so.
Everybody on this stage, we are all united, Wolf. We all believe that we need to try to end this war. In two nights you're going to have the Republican candidates here. They all support the war. They all support the president. They all supported the escalation. Each of us is trying in our
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BLITZER: Congressman Kucinich, you voted against the Patriot Act when it was first introduced. You've since voted again against it. But some would say yesterday's plot that was described by the FBI underscores the need for precisely that kind of tough measure to deal with potential terrorists out there.
KUCINICH: Benjamin Franklin once said that those who would give up their essential liberties to achieve a sense of security deserve neither.
KUCINICH: The Patriot Act has undermined civil rights in this country. And as president of the United States, one of my first acts in office will be to move forward to have the Justice Department overturn the Patriot Act as unconstitutional.
We have to remember that 9/11 led us down a cul de sac. Americans need to reconnect with our deepest sense of self here, Wolf. We have to remember that, you know, the courage that it took to form this country is still within us.
And I want to have what I call the 9/10 forum to recreate -- help us reconnect with the deeper sense of who we are as Americans.
BLITZER: We've got to move on to the next question. I want to go back to Scott.
Go ahead, Scott.
SPRADLING: Thanks, Wolf.
Senator Biden...
BIDEN: Yes, sir.
SPRADLING: Question for you on Iraq: You are the only person standing on this stage tonight to recently vote to continue funding the troops in Iraq.
My question is this. Why were Senators Obama, , Dodd, and Congressman Kucinich wrong to vote against the funding?
BIDEN: I'm not going to make a judgment on why they were wrong. I'll tell you why I was right.
No one has fought harder to change this president's policy.
Matter of fact, the very language that was vetoed in the was language that I, along with Senator Levin, put in, and I've suggested over a year ago in a proposal I laid forward. That is to start to draw down troops immediately, have them all out by '08.
But, you know, the fact of the matter is: It's about time. We've
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terrorist attack here in the United States for nearly six years?
OBAMA: You know, I think there are some things they've done well. I think they've cracked down on some of the financial networks. I think that is important.
They have, unfortunately, not strengthened our alliances with other countries. And one of the most important things that we're going to have to do to be successful in routing out these networks is to make sure that we have the cooperation of other nations.
That is not something that we've done. And the effort in Iraq has greatly weakened our efforts there.
BLITZER: Senator Edwards, let me let you clarify what you said the other day. You said the war on terror is a bumper sticker, not a plan.
With the news yesterday, this alleged plot at JFK which could have done, supposedly, horrendous damage and caused an incredible number of casualties, do you believe the U.S. is not at war with terrorists?
EDWARDS: I reject this bumper sticker, Wolf. And that's exactly what it is. It's a bumper sticker.
As president of the United States, I will do absolutely everything to find terrorists where they are, to stop them before they can do harm to us, before they can do harm to America or to its allies.
Every tool available -- military alliances, intelligence -- I will use.
But what this global war on terror bumper sticker -- political slogan, that's all it is, all it's ever been -- was intended to do was for George Bush to use it to justify everything he does: the ongoing war in Iraq, Guantanamo, Abu Ghraib, spying on Americans, torture.
None of those things are OK. They are not the United States of America.
BLITZER: All right.
Senator , do you agree with Senator Edwards that this war on terror is nothing more than a bumper sticker; at least the way it's been described?
: No, I do not. I am a senator from New York. I have lived with the aftermath of 9/11, and I have seen fir wing.
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You know, a lot of people around the world are writing America off. They do believe our best days are behind us. I could not disagree more.
I believe America can rebound from these last six years.
I believe we can restore fairness and ensure that all share in our prosperity.
I believe we can reduce the deficit and restore fiscal responsibility and give people the education and opportunities they need to fulfill their God-given potentials.
I'm running for president because I believe if we set big goals and we work together to achieve them, we can restore the American dream today and for the next generation.
The core ideals of a 21st-century progressivism are simple. The foundation of a strong economy is the investments we make in each other: in education, health care, clean energy and new technologies. Greatness comes from policies that promote prosperity and ensure we all share in it.
Now, living up to these ideals and changing the political makeup will not be easy. But I'm absolutely confident we can do it.
And I would just close by thinking of that Granite Stater Daniel Webster. He said it years ago when he urged us to "develop the resources of our land, call forth its powers, build up its institutions, promote all its great interests and see whether we also, in our day and generation, may not perform something worthy to be remembered."
I'm confident we have the discipline, the determination and the drive that we will not be the first generation in American history to leave our country worse off than when we found it. But we will continue, as every generation has before, to create much that is worthy to be remembered. We will restore fairness and responsibility to our economy, rebuild our middle class and rise to the challenges of this new global century.
Thank you all very much.
(APPLAUSE)
END


Obama, you get the first less dangerous world, partly as a consequence of this
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>>6569139
Buns are just so cute!
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Well, these are the kinds of new jobs that we need to be looking for across our country.
I also believe we have to invest in 21st-century infrastructure to compete. Let's set a goal of putting high-speed Internet access through broadband or wireless within the reach of every single American so that people throughout this state and every other one will be able to participate in the global economy.
In New York, as a senator, I've done a lot of work trying to work with chambers of commerce and others to create zones for access to high-speed Internet, because it was difficult to attract jobs to the Adirondacks or to other areas of rural New York without having that.
We haven't had much help from the federal government, but I've been introducing legislation every since I arrived in the Senate to do just that.
Just as we had a railroad system that connected our country, an electrification system, an interstate highway system, an airport system, we have to have a broadband system.
And, unfortunately, other countries are gaining on us and surpassing us, and that gives them economic advantages.
I also am not giving up on manufacturing.
: I believe we can still have a vibrant manufacturing base, with the right policies. It provides an immediate laboratory for innovation and a challenging feedback loop for engineers, designers and dreamers. It's an invaluable training ground for a new generation of entrepreneurs and leaders.
That's why I helped to start the Senate Manufacturing Caucus, where I've worked to develop a manufacturing strategy that will be suitable with the challenges of the 21st century.
I also founded a group called New Jobs for New York, a unique non-profit that harnesses the ingenuity, entrepreneurship and hard work of New Yorkers. And I want to do that across our country.
You know, we've been able to show companies i
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I think we also have to have a modern attitude toward unions. You know, we know that unionized workers make 30 percent more than workers who aren't in unions. But today, just 7 percent of our workforce in the private sector is unionized.
: We need to give workers more of the benefits that come with union membership. Let's pass the Employee Free Choice Act to make sure that unions can organize for fair wages and safe working conditions. Let's appoint people to the Department of Labor who are truly pro-labor.
That would be an unusual idea, don't you think?
(APPLAUSE)
Unions played a critical role in building the middle class. And I don't think it's a coincidence that as union membership has dropped, middle-class incomes have stagnated.
So this is not an either/or choice. We can have both.
Some people say, "Well, if you have more unionization that will make America un-competitive." But there are other countries in the global economy that pay wages equal to or higher than ours, and many jobs that are important to the economy in those countries demand a really good living wage for a middle-class family.
Their lower-paid workers are paid more than our lower-paid workers. But their higher-paid workers are paid less. So there's less of a gap between our lower-paid workers and our highest-paid workers, which means that there's more money for those wage increases in the middle.
That's what worked for America until relatively recently. And that's what we have to persuade people is good for America again.
Eighth, let's ensure everyone has the most fundamental benefit there is: quality, affordable health care. Now, we know that this is going to be challenging. But if we could spend more than $500 ion to fund the war in Iraq, we can surely make the basic investments to ensure that every American can see a doctor when he or she n our families. To talking a lot more about in for our economy.
: By
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And this is something...
(APPLAUSE)
... this is something I feel very strongly about. We have sent a message to our young people, that if you don't go to college and you don't have a high-paying job, something like a basketball player or an entertainer or maybe someone in a corporation, that you're thought less of in America.
We have to stop this. Our country cannot run without the people who do the skills that are taught in this school. And it is time we begin to reverse the attitude that I think for too long has prevailed.
Which is why I'm so pleased that Governor Lynch will be adding to the money available through the state for technology and other kinds of advanced degree learning that can give young people a belief that doing these jobs is important.
As senator, I championed regional skills alliances that support employers in the same geographic region and industry. They support employers who pool their resources and broaden opportunities so employees can get the training they need in today's economy.
Those 1,200 people who come at night: That's what they're doing. They're trying to get additional skills that will enable them to fill jobs that already exist in this region.
And we're going to create more jobs and more regional skills alliances when I'm president.
Seventh, let's ensure that people who work hard every day can support their families and save for the future. I do not believe anyone who works full-time in America should draw a wage that puts that person below the poverty line.
If you're a full-time worker, you should make more than poverty.
(APPLAUSE)
Now that we've finally increased the minimum wage, let's expand and simplify the earned income tax credit so no one working full-time lives in poverty.
Let's also finally overhaul our unemployment insurance program.
Today's unemployment benefits aren't even enough to keep an average family above the poverty line. f employers don't want to give p ge.
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We also have to do more to raise up the opportunity for young people from middle-class and working families and poor families to be able to go to college.
You know, 75 percent of students at America's elite colleges come from the top 25 percent of the income bracket, just 3 percent from the bottom 25 percent.
We've got to make college affordable again, and that means everything from increasing Pell grants to changing the way college loans are provided and cleaning up the college loan industry from all of the scandals that is besetting it. Because if we don't make college affordable, we are seeing the results: Young people can't go.
The last time I was in Manchester I was talking with some of the teachers from one of the high schools here who told me that many young people were just really confused because they didn't have the money to go to college, and they didn't know what they were going to do. So we've got to do a better job than that.
Sixth, for those who don't attend four-year colleges and those in the workforce who need to update their skills, let's provide more support for schools like this and for community colleges that prepare people for good, high-paying jobs.
And let's provide wage insurance for our workers so that if you lose your job because of our trade policies, y ay reports that we have 37,000 vacancies for mechanics right now. These jobs pay salaries up to $70,000 a year. And employers are aggressively recruiting talented high school graduates to fill these positions.
I met recently with the Machinists Union. They were telling me the same story about airline mechanics. They have hundreds of good jobs that they can't fill.
It's not just that we can't fill these jobs; it's that we've come to a point in our society where, frankly, we don't show the respect that these jobs should demand.
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You know, people ask me all the time, "Why can't we get tough on China?" Well, the answer is, because China is one of our bankers. We're their debtor. How can we truly enforce trade laws against a country that manipulates it currency and puts us at an unfair advantage when our economic stability depends on China's massive loans to us every single day?
And when the president's irresponsible tax breaks for high-income Americans expire, we will return to the income tax rates for upper- income Americans that we had in the 1990s, rates that were consistent with a balanced budget and economic growth.
For middle-class Americans, who haven't seen their paychecks increase, let's keep the middle-class tax cuts and reform the alternative minimum tax in order to give middle-class Americans the tax relief they deserve to have.
(APPLAUSE)
: And let's take a hard look at corporate tax reform. It's simply not fair that as corporate profits have skyrocketed, the percentage of taxes paid by corporations have fallen.
It's time we restored the balance and required corporations to pay their fair share. Under the law, after all, they are citizens of the United States, with many of the responsibilities, I would argue, that goes with citizenship.
Fifth, let's recommit ourselves to the idea that every young person in America who wants to should have the opportunity to attend college, and that a 21st-century education starts early in life and continues well into adulthood.
(APPLAUSE)
We know that having the most skilled, educated workforce in the world is key to our future success. That starts at the very beginning, with access to universal pre-kindergarten: high-quality learning opportunities for every 4-year-old in America. And I've laid out a proposal that would do exactly that.
We know that pre-kindergarten keeps kids in school longer, keeps them out of trouble, gives them more inc ber of children who are failin sons.
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Now that middle class is under assault from global economic forces and wrongheaded economic policies. So I'm proposing a new progressive plan to restore that American dream and to give all Americans the chance to compete and prosper in the global economy.
Here's what I believe we should do.
First, I'm going to work to level the playing field and reduce the special breaks for big corporations. We say this in every campaign. We make a little bit of progress. And then unfortunately, when the Republicans get back in office, they reverse everything we've done and add to the corporate welfare.
Well, I think we're going to have a better shot this time...
(APPLAUSE)
... because we're going to make it an issue in this campaign. We're going to ask people who are running for Congress to sign up one way or the other: Are they for corporate welfare, or are they for the average American having a decent shot at the American dream?
And there's a lot we could do right now.
You know, I believe that if we did give Medicare the chance to negotiate with drug companies, we would save $10 ion to $15 ion a year. Why should the drug companies be immune from the process that goes on every day in America, where you bargain for the best deal you can get? And we need to give our government that opportunity to do so.
When was president, he gave it to the V.A., which is one of the reasons why the V.A. has the lowest drug prices in America today. Bargaining really does make a difference.
: We also need...
(APPLAUSE)
... to require the big oil companies that are making the largest profits in the history of the world to invest in alternative energy themselves or pay into a fund to spur clean energy research and development. And there are many other examples that we could all give about how to zero in on corporate welfare.
Second, let's once and for all get rid of the incentives for American companies to ship jobs and States. An ho ship jobs to tax havens.
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Health care premiums have gone up 87 percent since 2000; college costs up 40 percent since the 2000 school year. Gas prices have more than doubled. And I don't need to tell anyone that they're heading even higher today.
Wages and incomes are lagging so much that, after five years of overall growth, there's been a 4 percent increase in the percentage of workers falling below the poverty line, and a 4 percent increase in working families losing their health insurance.
It's like our middle-class and hardworking families are invisible to this president.
If you're a worker who can't organize for fair wages and safe working conditions, you're invisible.
If you're one of the over 45 million Americans who don't have health insurance, you're invisible, too.
If your company has shipped your job overseas and you don't know how to pay your s, well, you're invisible.
If you drive up to the gas station and have to pay $3.20 or $3.30 a gallon to fill up your tank, you're invisible as well.
Well, you're not invisible to me. And we can't restore the American dream unless you're a very visible part of it.
It's time for a new beginning, for an end to government of the few, by the few and for the few, time to reject the idea of an "on your own" society and to replace it with shared responsibility for shared prosperity. I prefer a "we're all in it together" society.
Now, there is no greater force for economic growth than free markets, but markets work best with rules that promote our values, protect our workers and give all people a chance to succeed.
When we get our priorities in order and make the smart investments we need, the markets work well.
Some of you might remember that, while we began the 1990s with record deficits, we ended the decade with a balanced budget, a record surplus, higher wages for the middle class, and 22 million new jobs.
Now, of course, we can't simply recycle the policies that worked i s that have worked time a ance. I grew up in a middle-clas
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Today I want to focus on how we ensure both strong economic growth and economic fairness.
Now, we have seen for more than a century that fairness doesn't just happen. It requires the right government policies. And no one should be surprised, human nature being what it is, people will go as far as they possibly can get away with.
The genius of the American economic in the 20th century was that it helped to counter that tendency for people to push as far as their own interests would take them so that we created a leveler playing field that benefited everyone.
Unfortunately, for the past six years it's as though we've gone back to the era of the robber barons. Year after year the president has handed out massive tax breaks to oil companies, no-bid contracts to Halliburton, tax incentives to corporations shipping jobs overseas, tax cut after tax cut to multimillionaires, while ignoring the needs and aspirations of tens of millions of working families.
And how has he paid for all of this largess? By running up record deficits. He has simply charged it to our national credit card and left our children and grandchildren to pay the .
In fact, every baby born today starts like with $29,000 of national debt on his or her tiny shoulders, the largest birth tax in our nation's history.
It's also important to understand these policies are consistent with the administration's theory about how we should manage our economy: leave it all up to the individual.
That's why they want to privatize Social Security and let individuals bear the risks. It's why their answer to the health care crisis is limited to creating health savings account, which allows the healthiest people to get the best deal, with little concern if the sickest get worse.
: They call it the ownership society. But it's really the "on your own" society.
On the other hand, they protect the drug companies from competition, including from their ow
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>>6569185
Fair, but I've grown a fondness for tubes.
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I believe people are fed up with the policies of the past six years. So many people I talk to just want to hit the restart button on the 21st century and redo it the right way. And I agree with them.
(APPLAUSE)
Now, after all, we started the decade with rising incomes, declining inequality, robust job growth and a surplus in our federal budget. Instead of building on policies that worked, the Washington Republicans reversed them with predictable but intolerable consequences.
I believe that one of the most crucial jobs of the next president is to define a new vision of economic fairness and prosperity for the 21st century, a vision for how we ensure greater opportunity for our next generation, and then to outline a strategy and then to implement it.
Today, I believe we need a new progressive vision for this new century.
Now, I consider myself a thoroughly optimistic and modern progressive.
I believe we can grow our economy in the face of global competition, and in a way that benefits all Americans.
I believe we can curb the excesses of the marketplace and provide more opportunities for more Americans to succeed.
I believe we can support and promote smart trade policies that truly enforce strong labor and environmental standards.
: I believe we can help more workers join unions to improve wages and conditions in our workplaces for jobs that cannot be shipped overseas.
I believe that, just as 20th-century progressives fought corruption with a new civil service, we can restore competence to the front lines of our government and ensure that we never, ever experience another Hurricane Katrina.
In short, I believe that our government can once again work for all Americans. It can promote the great American tradition of opportunity for all and special privileges for none.
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(CROSSTALK)
EMANUEL: I got it, thank you. This one I know how to do.
(LAUGHTER)
But I appreciate the guidance and counsel.
Let me say this, out of respect to our leadership. If I'm not mistaken the two leaders, Senator Reid and Speaker Pelosi, are going to be holding a press conference a little later. And I don't want to be presumptuous and get ahead of them. It's a fair question, but I think they'll answer it then, if you just hold off until about 2:15.
END


SEN. RODHAM DELIVERS REMARKS AT MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY, 5/29/2007
(JOINED IN PROGRESS)
: ... a middle-class lifestyle.
Now, during the second half of the 1990s, productivity growth led to rising incomes across the board.
But over the past six years, while productivity has gone up 18 percent -- that means Americans are working harder than ever and, by most indicators, working harder than anybody else in the rest of the world -- family incomes have gone down $1,300.
The global labor market may even be depressing wages for skilled and professional jobs. Since 2001, new jobs created in America pay, on average, 21 percent less than the jobs we have lost.
And back in 2000, child poverty was the lowest it had been in 20 years. Since then it has risen by 1.3 million. And today we have 12 million children living in poverty.
Now, given these realities, it's unsurprising we're seeing rising inequality and rising pessimism in our workforce.
Today more than 80 percent of Americans believe that our manufacturing jobs are at risk of being outsourced.
And let's be clear. It's not as if America hasn't been successful economically these past years. But the measure of success doesn't relate what's happening in households across our country, because, while productivity and corporate profits are up, the fruits of that success just hasn't reached many of our families. It's li rn economy and those who a blem worse.
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So I thank you for that.
EMANUEL: I want to make a couple quick points that haven't been made. The Kaiser Foundation did a study. One out of five of our military families rely on either food stamps or the WIC program to make ends meet -- one out of five.
So we are talking about something that's essential to folks.
EMANUEL: The second is, I've participated in an administration where we've written a number of administration policies. I really want to know who the knucklehead is that said that combat pay -- that pay at 3.5 percent is too much. I want to know who the person is that recommended a $40 a month survivor's benefit was too much for the wealthiest country in the world.
Now, I applaud the administration for one simple thing, because when you write a statement of administration policy, not just one person sees it, everybody looks at it, and not one person in that administration said, "You know what? This may be a political problem. Forget the policy. This may be a mistake. We're in the middle of Iraq and Afghanistan and we're going to deny a pay increase of 3.5 percent and survivor benefits of a month for $40."
And nobody who looked at that statement, after everything Patrick said, during combat pay, they opposed it. Imminent danger pay increase -- opposed it. Nobody thought, having seen this, it was wrong.
And since last Thursday when we've been hitting on this, there is still not one statement out of the administration on this. We're asked them to tell us why you would veto a over an increase in pay for our enlistees and a survivor's benefit and nobody will take ownership of this issue. Not one person.
And the only thing I can say, having opposed this pay raise, opposing this survivor's benefit, opposing the combat pay, and opposing the imminent danger pay, they are consistent in their opposition to the pay increases for our enlistees and Guard and Reserve.
Rhetoric is fi
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MURPHY: But I want to talk about what we believe in, the values that we believe in, and the things that we need to do to support our troops.
This defense is making sure that our armed forces, which have been stretched so thin by this president, are ready and able to continue protecting our families here at home.
We support the troops and we are giving them the right equipment, like mine-resistant vehicles. We are giving them a pay raise, not a pay raise that we really should be giving them, but a 3.5 percent pay raise. And we are increasing the benefits to those spouses who had to face the worst news of all -- the death of their husband or wife.
Unfortunately, President Bush's opposition to doing the right thing by our troops is a pattern of neglect. I'm sad to say this is not the first time this has happened under his watch.
When I was back in Baghdad, back in 2003, in August it was 138 degrees. They called it fire month. And the Pentagon under the Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and President Bush wanted to cut our combat pay. They wanted to cut our combat pay in the middle of a war zone. And that's an increase in pay to our soldiers in monthly stipend.
And threatening to cut what's called imminent danger pay, and threatening to veto this with a pay raise, shows that President Bush is out of touch with the needs of our military.
With this defense , with this pay raise we're not talking about a lot of money. But if you're an enlisted man with a couple years of service under your belt the money can make all the difference in the world. A pay raise of 3.5 percent for a private making $17,000 a year is less than $1,000 per year.
But with s to pay and young children to support, several hundred dollars a year is a big deal.
MURPHY: As someone who's fought in Iraq and spoken to our families shattered by tragedy, nge e against that.
Having come and spent my career in the
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: But now the issue before us is whether we're going to provide this modest raise.
I met Captain Patrick Murphy in Baghdad in 2003. And he made a tremendously positive impression on me. He was serving with the 82nd Airborne. I was with Jack Reed. We went from the Green Zone into Sadr City to go to the forward operating post that the 82nd had set up. I was privileged to have lunch with then-Captain Murphy.
And, you know, maybe it's because I have a lot of personal contact with the young men and women who wear the uniform from New York, and now increasingly from around our country. Maybe it's because I've done a lot of work with our wounded vets and have seen the impact of losing limbs and suffering from traumatic brain injury. Maybe it's because these are the best that America has to offer. But for the life me, I don't understand why this administration would stand in the way of giving this pay increase to our military.
We know that they deserve it. And we know that we're going to do everything we can in the Democratic Congress to make sure that they get it.
MURPHY: Thanks, ma'am.
Thanks, everybody, for being here. I'm Patrick Murphy from the 8th District of Pennsylvania, which is Bucks County, northeast Philadelphia and a small slice of Montgomery County.
I left active duty back in 2004, when I came back from Baghdad. And I was a member of the 82nd Airborne Division.
I serve on the Armed Services Committee, so we were the ones that did the markup to this . And I always p ntatives. Five of those 49 are veterans. All five are Democrats.
Now, I was kidding with someone the other day. Tim Walz and I share a very small apartment here on Capitol Hill. And someone said, "Well, you know, you were a captain. He was a command sergeant major. So you outrank Tim Walz."
I said, "Obviously, you didn't serve in the military if you think a command sergeant major is outranked by a captain."
(LAUGHTER)
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: Well, thank you so much, Senator Kerry.
I'm proud to join Senator Kerry, along with the members of Congress, to support raising the salaries of our men and women who wear the uniform of our country.
Now, this is a moment of profound challenge for America. And it's especially a moment of great danger for our men and women who serve us.
While there are strong disagreements here in Washington on any subject you can name, I hope we can unite around our common values when it comes to how we treat our service members.
Now, if you serve your country, your country should serve you. That's the promise that we make when a young man or woman signs up to defend the United States of America.
Sadly, too often in the past several years that promise has been broken, whether it's a lack of armored Humvees or body armor, a lack of appropriate care and outpatient facilities at Walter Reed and elsewhere or a lack of the necessary resources in the V.A..
And now we learn that the Bush administration stands against a modest pay increase, a modest pay raise to support the families of those who serve, to cover the expenses of everyday life, to live on the modest salary that we provide for the men and women of our military.
You know, the pattern is clear. The president asks our troops and their families to bear a great burden. But when it comes time to match that sacrifice with enough resources or smart strategies, the president is not there.
We're borrowing ions to cover the cost of the war in Iraq. Think about it this way: Every day, we borrow money from China to pay our troops. I think that undermines our security. Why compound it by not providing the pay raise that our troops need in order to do the work that we've asked them to do?
We obviously have bigger issues -- when we finally are able to address them -- with respect to how we're going to fund the military, what we're going to do with respect to fiscal responsibility and how we're going to take care of the V.A.
>>
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>>6569260
This is a good senpai
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>>6569260
>tfw I had the same plan with a similar image
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>>6569265
Ha, me too but I had another badger pic ready to go.
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>>6569260
You are the hero this thread needs.
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>>6569265
brothers in heresy must stick together
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>Joker cucked again
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>>6569316
Its weird how he guns for weaver.
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>>6569321
Does he? I never even noticed.
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>>6569321
Its just weird he's still at it at all, most people have learned to just ignore him.
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>>6569339
He saw new posters, and he wanted to drive them away. The fact that they drew Pack Street fanart probably didn't help.
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>>6569339
Apparently some people have nothing better to do.
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>>6569346
Was a very cute Ram and Fluff Fox. I hope they do more of the cast, such a cute style.
>>
are we just waiting for el-faggotburrito to go away before we do a new thread?
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>>6569374
I loved those pics. Loved the Lioness Heiress, too. Both have awesome styles. That really sweepy style of the Pack Street lover is awesome. Almost reminds me like a cleaner, more... pleasant?... Lucius (who has more monstrous and grotesque draws, and I mean this in a good way). And the other artist (093? Mint?) has a really nice chunkiness to their characters. They feel round, but pliable, like you could smoosh them a bit. Hope to see more of them.
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>>6569393
Ya I'm just giving it some time to see if we could get another cleaning done before throwing another one up.
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>>6569400
Smoosh is always a nice characteristic for snuggling.
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If dubs I reveal a horrible secret.
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>>6569413
if dubs you go to sleep and dream of bunny
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>>6569413
Ah well, close.
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>>6569413
if trips you tell us anyway
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>>6569429
You know what?

I'll tell you the secret, no dubs at all...

...I think Charlie is cuter when shipped with Marty.
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>>6569437
THAT'S... actually an interesting idea
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>>6569437
I can agree with that, Marty needs a nice bit of strange fluff to keep him in check. I bet he helps her brush her tail.
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>>6569437
the matching sweaters tell the truth
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>>6569466
G E N I U S
didn't even catch that detail desu
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>>6569437
I see Marty as more of her responsible older brother.
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>>6569471
Right
responsible older brother
that she also fucks
Were on the same page
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>>6569471
And as a responsible older brother he must "help" her with her urges, especially during fox mating season.
>Marty needs to put a whole arm inside Charlie to satisfy her
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New thread where?
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>>6569507
When we reach page 10. We like making Joker wait. Till then, we text post.
>>
Eh, doesn't look like we're getting another rinsing.

>>6569509
>>6569509
>>6569509



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